Tag Archives: writing

Word-count Wednesday #3

Hello fellow writers!

We’ve reached that middle stretch of Nanowrimo, and November. Today’s word count goal is 25,00 words, and for once I am still ahead of schedule at 29,584 words. But regardless of whether you have reached the halfway point in your novel and written around 25,000 words or if you just have a couple thousand written you should be proud of yourself.

But beware, we’ve also reached the point where sometimes the magic fades from your story, where you start to wonder why you are trying to finish this story and whether you should give up and write something else… Guess what? You’re not alone, and even authors like John Green face these sorts of doubts:

At this point, you’ve probably realized that it’s nearly impossible to write a good book in a month. I’ve been at this a while and have yet to write a book in less than three years. All of us harbor secret hopes that a magnificent novel will tumble out of the sky and appear on our screens, but almost universally, writing is hard, slow, and totally unglamorous. So why finish what you’ve started? Because in two weeks, when you are done, you will be grateful for the experience. (John Green 2010 Pep Talk)

Keep your chins up everyone and let’s keep at it!

~aw

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Harry Potter Fanfiction Contest Winner

Here at the Bartlett Library, we celebrated the anniversary of the first Harry Potter book all through the month of June.  One of the ways we asked you to celebrate with us was by submitting your Harry Potter fanfiction stories and we received some GREAT entries!  Without further ado, we’d like to congratulate Matea, whose submission, The Marauders, won first place in the 4th-6th grade category.  Thank you to everyone who submitted their work.  We have some budding authors in our midst!

Read the winning entry The Marauders!  Read about the winners in the teen categories HERE.

 

 

Camp Nanowrimo

Have you ever wanted to write a novel or thought about participating in Nanowrimo? Sometimes November is a difficult or busy month, and sometimes 50,000 words just seems like too much to tackle!Camp Nanowrimo

If you have ever had these thoughts then Camp Nanowrimo is for you! Camp Nanowrimo allows you to set your own word goal (it can be any number that you want – big or small!), and join a cabin of fellow writers to cheer each other on. Camp Nanowrimo runs twice each year: once in April and once in July. Best of all you can watch your progress on a handy little target, it sure motivates me when I watch the arrow get closer to the bullseye.

You can sign up at: https://campnanowrimo.org/ Is anyone thinking about giving it a shot?

Camp Nanowrimo

Have you ever wanted to write a novel or thought about participating in Nanowrimo? Sometimes November is a difficult or busy month, and sometimes 50,000 words just seems like too much to tackle!Camp Nanowrimo

If you have ever had these thoughts then Camp Nanowrimo is for you! Camp Nanowrimo allows you to set your own word goal (it can be any number that you want – big or small!), and join a cabin of fellow writers to cheer each other on. Camp Nanowrimo runs twice each year: once in April and once in July. Best of all you can watch your progress on a handy little target, it sure motivates me when I watch the arrow get closer to the bullseye.

You can sign up at: https://campnanowrimo.org/ Is anyone thinking about giving it a shot?

Word-count Wednesday #5

Hello fellow writers!

This is it! The final Word-count Wednesday! Can you believe that Nanowrimo is almost over? If you reach 50,000 words by midnight be sure to validate your word count. The validator might become a little slow in the last hour so try not to wait until last minute.

Early this morning I crossed the finish line, the official final word count was 50,132 words! This is slightly more words than Microsoft Word said I had, so be sure to keep in mind that the validator might not match whatever program you are writing in.nanowrimo_2016_webbadge_winner

I hope you have crossed the finish line along with me, or will in the next few hours but if not you should still be proud of what you’ve accomplished. You have more of your novel written than you did at the beginning of the month whether you wrote 100 words, a thousand words or more. This isn’t the end of all the writing fun either, you can check out the forums for things to keep you busy in ‘Life After Nano’ and you can make a promise to revise and edit your story. This isn’t the end, this is just the beginning! Also, if you’re interested in trying to publish your novel the library has lots of books to help with editing and publishing!

Word-count Wednesday #4

Hello fellow writers!

The target word count for today, November 23th is 38,333 words. For once I am a little bit ahead of schedule at 38,910 words, it is part of my plan to enjoy Thanksgiving. Since my family celebrates the holiday, I have tried to build in a little buffer to the word-count. The only time I will have to write tomorrow is after I’ve cleaned the house but before all of the guests arrive. I recommend not worrying about your word-count tomorrow, if you have time to write congratulations, you rock! If not, that’s okay there is still time to catch up.

If you’re somehow already at 50,000 words or you get there this weekend then don’t forget to validate your word-count! You just paste the text of your novel into the validator on the website, and if you have 50,000 words you’ll win! You get access to some snazzy offers by companies that promote Nanowrimo and a nice winner’s certificate. Be aware that the word-count validator on the website will not quite match whatever your writing program is (Word, Pages, etc.), sometimes you will have more words than you thought and sometimes less so be prepared.

This week let’s get some advice from James Patterson to help get us through to the end:

Get into a writing routine. Think it’s hard to write every day during NaNo? Most professional writers keep this kind of pace all year round. Holidays, birthdays, vacations—you name it, we’re writing. The trick is making writing into a daily habit. Same time. Same place. Same hot beverage of choice. Every. Single. Day. Again. And. Again.

Don’t stress. I don’t mean to undermine the above, but remember this is one month, not your entire writing career. Try hard, learn from it, and if you don’t get to 50,000 words, figure out what you did wrong so you can get there next time.” (James Patterson 2013 Pep Talk)

There’s just one more week to go! We can do it!

Word-count Wednesday #3

Hello fellow writers!

We’ve reached that middle stretch of Nanowrimo, and November. Today’s word count goal is 26,666 words, and for once I am exactly on track. But regardless of whether you have reached the halfway point in your novel and written around 25,000 words or if you just have a couple thousand written you should be proud of yourself.

But beware, we’ve also reached the point where sometimes the magic fades from your story, where you start to wonder why you are trying to finish this story and whether you should give up and write something else… Guess what? You’re not alone, and even authors like John Green face these sorts of doubts:

At this point, you’ve probably realized that it’s nearly impossible to write a good book in a month. I’ve been at this a while and have yet to write a book in less than three years. All of us harbor secret hopes that a magnificent novel will tumble out of the sky and appear on our screens, but almost universally, writing is hard, slow, and totally unglamorous. So why finish what you’ve started? Because in two weeks, when you are done, you will be grateful for the experience. (John Green 2010 Pep Talk)

Even Chris Baty, who helped launch Nanowrimo and turned it into what it is today, struggled through the midway blues:

NaNoWriMo participants go through their own long, dark nights of the soul halfway through November. If you haven’t experienced one already, you will very soon…[But] the back half of NaNoWriMo has always been a place where writers get their second winds. As long as you keep working, your potatoes will turn back into charismatic protagonists, and your imagination will build a path right out of these mid-month doldrums.

You can help build that path faster by hitting your writing goals for the next three days. This may sound like a small thing, but little, consistent writing achievements open the door to huge writing breakthroughs. (Chris Baty 2012 Pep Talk)

Chris Baty gives even more helpful tips in his book, No Plot, No Problem which you can borrow from the library. So don’t give up! Let’s stay on track and push past these mid-month blues!