Tag Archives: world-building

Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

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Book Review: The Amulet of Samarkand (Graphic Novel)

amulet of samarkand.jpgToday I recommend The Amulet of Samarkand A Bartimaeus Graphic Novel by Jonathan Stroud, Andrew Donkin, Lee Sullivan and Nicolas Chapuis.

This graphic novel is about a young magician boy and a powerful djinni, a type of demon named Bartimaeus. The graphic novel switches between both of their perspectives. The boy orders Bartimaeus to steal from a powerful magician, a thing that even he, a very powerful demon, has a hard time doing.

I thought this novel was really cool. It has magic, suspense and is a graphic novel. It is not too sad, but has a couple explosions. Bartimaeus, the demon, is very funny and witty, always trying to get out of doing the boy’s wishes. Bartimaeus is a lot like a genie except does not live in a tight space, has unlimited wishes, and has dark humor. The main boy is very ambitious and also very bitter about the past. I liked this novel a lot. I suggest this novel to who ever likes magic, suspense and of course, demons.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC STROUD.

Book Review: The Giver

 

In the novel “The Giver”, Lois Lowry presents a unique dystopian community without any differences among the people. In this community, at the age of twelve, you are assigned a job based on your knowledge on a certain subject. This is the only job you will have throughout your life. This novel follows a 12-year-old boy named Jonas who hasn’t been assigned but selected to be the next Receiver of Memory. As Jonas receives his training from the present Receiver of Memory, he experiences many feelings that existed many generations ago, but not today.

All these feeling and memories were held inside everyone, until the community decided to change into Sameness. Sameness is total control over everything in order to make it the same. As Jonas and the Giver (present Receiver of Memory) continue with their training, Jonas wanted to make a difference. He wanted to change the community. He wanted everyone to feel want he felt. The Giver told him that if he crosses the boundary of memory, all the memories within him will spread throughout the community and the people.


Originally published in 1993, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry is a John Newbery Medal award winning book that consists of thrilling, exciting, and creative thoughts. I would recommend this book to readers that are interested in a new and innovative world where everyone is the same with no differences. This book makes you want to read more and more until there are no more pages.


A riveting utopian novel that’s expertly crafted.”  –  commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

Throwback Thursday: Watership Down

watership downIt’s Throwback Thursday again! Today Librarian Sandra recommends: Watership Down by Richard Adams.

In a constant struggle against oppression, a group of rabbits search for peaceful co-existence. Chronicles the adventures of a group of rabbits searching for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

A winner of the Carnegie Medal and published in 1972, this tale centered around rabbits is not as lighthearted as it might seem from the cover. This book is recommended for those in grades 6 and above. This book is another classic that was adapted into a movie (in 1978)!