Tag Archives: Upbeat

Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

Advertisements

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The View from Saturday

The view from saturday.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsberg.

Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.

This is a classic that isn’t as old as most that we have featured- it was published in 1996 and won the Newbery Award. Still this heartwarming tale about being kind, civil, and inclusive is undoubtedly a classic. My favorite part of the book was that it was written from multiple perspectives which allowed me to feel as though I was getting to know each of the students. This is perfect for upper elementary school readers who enjoy realistic fiction, and for those who enjoyed the recent Newbery winner Hello Universe by Erin Kelly Entrada.

You can find The View from Saturday in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBERG.

~aw

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: A Long Way from Chicago

long way from chicagoFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck.

A boy recounts his annual summer trips to rural Illinois with his sister during the Great Depression to visit their larger-than-life grandmother.

Originally published in 1998, this book was awarded the Newbery Honor in 1999. The sequel, A Year Down Yonder, won the Newbery Medal for children’s literature in 2001. This historical fiction class is available in large print and as an audiobook! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.

Book Review: The Tea Dragon Society

tea dragon societyToday I recommend: The Tea Dragon Society by Katie O’Neill.

After discovering a lost Tea Dragon in the marketplace, apprentice blacksmith Greta learns about the dying art form of Tea Dragon caretaking from the kind tea shop owners.

First of all, the art in this graphic novel is stunning. It feels a little manga-like as an art style but everything is a soothing pastel color scheme. This is a sweet fantasy story about the importance of patience and friendship. The book also has a lovely cast of characters and tea dragons with an array of different skin colors, orientations, and abilities. The whole graphic novel is whimsical and drama free – a sweet happy story! Also charming is the section at the end that gives tips for raising a tea dragon and information about the different types of tea dragons.

You can find The Tea Dragon Society in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J Graphic O’Neill.

~aw

Jazz Day

jazz dayToday I recommend: Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill.

A collection of poems recounts the efforts of Esquire magazine graphic designer Art Kane to photograph a group of famous jazz artists in front of a Harlem brownstone.

This is an interesting book of poetry, where all of the poems relate to the people and events that were a part of the photograph that inspired Roxane Orgill’s poetry. The author’s notes at the end include biographies of the musicians, and a set of foldout pages include a reproduction of the photograph. I recommend this for anyone interested in jazz music, as well as anyone who wants to read nonfiction without just reading a list of facts.

You can find Jazz Day in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j811.54 ORGILL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Pippi Longstocking

If you have seen the movie “Pippi Longstocking,” you might like to read the story by Astrid Lindgren. The book was first published 72 years ago in 1945! The series about Pippi Longstocking has been adapted into numerous books, DVDs, and graphic novels. Pippi lives by herself on the edge of a Swedish village with a monkey and a horse.  For more adventures of Pippi read “Pippi Goes to School.”

You can find the books in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LINDGREN.

~ps

 

Book Review: Awkward

awkwardToday I recommend: Awkward by Svetlana Chmakova.

After shunning Jaime, the school nerd, on her first day at a new middle school, Penelope Torres tries to blend in with her new friends in the art club, until the art club goes to war with the science club, of which Jaime is a member.

The bright colors and the expressive characters make for a playful and fun graphic novel that tackles the stress of starting at a new school, and learning how to get along with people who have different interests. If you love the characters you can check out, Brave which follows the school newspaper club and one of the art students from this graphic novel! This is a great option for readers who have already fallen in love with graphic novels like Raina Telgemeier’s Smile and Shannon Hale’s Real Friends.

As an awesome bonus the artist/author added pages at the end of the book that show how she goes about making the story and pages for the comics. This is a neat look into the process of creating a graphic novel.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC CHMAKOVA.

~aw