Tag Archives: Teen Blogger

Book Review: Paper Things

Paper Things.jpgPaper Things – Jennifer Jacobson

Paper Things is a thrilling novel by Jennifer Jacobson that tells the life of a nineteen-year-old Gage and his younger sister being homeless for six weeks. When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So, when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she must go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been “couch surfing,” staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama?

This novel will engender empathy and understanding of a serious and all-too-real problem. Jacobson’s story is poignant but never preachy. — School Library Journal


Paper Things by Jennifer Jacobson is a heart-touching novel and is originally published on February 10, 2015. Paper Things is a Rebecca Caudill 2019 nominee and has won several awards such as, the ILA Social Justice Literature Award for Fiction winner, and Hudson Bookseller’s Best of Summer 2015. I would recommend Paper Things to a reader that is looking for a thrilling novel.

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

You can find Paper Things on the Rebecca Caudill shelf during the 2018-19, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J JACOBSEN.

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Book Review: Pablo and Birdy

Pablo and Birdy

Today I recommend: Pablo and Birdy by Alison McGhee and illustrated by Ana Juan.

This descriptive novel is about a boy named Pablo and his lavender colored parrot, called Birdy. One morning, during the change of winds, baby Pablo and birdy washed up on the shore of Isla floating on a tiny baby pool wrapped in twine. Emanuel, a shop owner took Pablo in and raised him. Birdy was always by Pablo’s side. Birdy was like Pablo’s guardian and friend. But when Pablo turns ten, he wants to know who his parents are, where he came from, and other things like that. And besides that, there are the legends of the Sea Farring parrot, a mystical parrot that can hear all sounds and noises of the world at anytime.

This  book was amazingly descriptive, very funny and touching. There were funny characters, including a group of parrots and a chicken called the committee. I listened to the audiobook version, and it was hilarious. My favorite character is the pastry stealing dog because he is funny and does not learn his lesson.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find the audiobook in the Juvenile Audiobook section at jCD FIC MCGHEE, and the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MCGHEE.

 

Book Review: The Amulet of Samarkand (Graphic Novel)

amulet of samarkand.jpgToday I recommend The Amulet of Samarkand A Bartimaeus Graphic Novel by Jonathan Stroud, Andrew Donkin, Lee Sullivan and Nicolas Chapuis.

This graphic novel is about a young magician boy and a powerful djinni, a type of demon named Bartimaeus. The graphic novel switches between both of their perspectives. The boy orders Bartimaeus to steal from a powerful magician, a thing that even he, a very powerful demon, has a hard time doing.

I thought this novel was really cool. It has magic, suspense and is a graphic novel. It is not too sad, but has a couple explosions. Bartimaeus, the demon, is very funny and witty, always trying to get out of doing the boy’s wishes. Bartimaeus is a lot like a genie except does not live in a tight space, has unlimited wishes, and has dark humor. The main boy is very ambitious and also very bitter about the past. I liked this novel a lot. I suggest this novel to who ever likes magic, suspense and of course, demons.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC STROUD.

Book Review: Ghost

Ghost by Jason Reynolds.pngGHOST – Jason Reynolds

Ghost is a young adult novel by Jason Reynolds which follows seventh-grader Castle “Ghost” Cranshaw as he joins a track team and struggles to deal with his past and his present. Ever since his father went to jail, Castle Cranshaw’s life suddenly switched directions. He was behind in school, always in trouble, and didn’t have the money for essential needs. One day, when Ghost impulsively challenges an elite sprinter to a race-and wins- the Olympic medalist track coach sees that he has something: crazy natural talent. Only with the dreams of playing ball, he unexpectedly joined the track team. Ghost doesn’t only get bullied in school for not having good clothes, but also on his track team (Defenders). Mainly because he doesn’t have running shoes. He then steals a pair of shiny sliver running shoes to shut down all the bullies. Eventually, coach finds out and plans to tell Ghost’s mother. Until he started begging not to. All the trouble-making, all the stealing, and all the bullying comes down to this one point in Ghost’s life. The first track meet of the season. Can Ghost harness his raw talent for speed and meld with the team, or will his past finally catch up to him?

Ghost by Jason Reynolds originally published on August 30, 2016, is one of the finalists for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature. Ghost is also the first book in Jason Reynolds’s explosive Track series about a fast but fiery group of kids who have a shot at the Junior Olympics, but have a lot to prove first-to each other, and to themselves. I would recommend this book to readers that are searching for a thriller, as well as meaningful book in their lives.

Another poignant, engaging, exciting novel that combines middle school, sports, and life lessons from Coretta Scott King Honor author Jason Reynolds – commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu S., Teen Blogger

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J REYNOLDS.

Book Review: Roller Girl

Roller GirlToday I recommend Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson.

Roller Girl is a very inspiring graphic novel about a girl named Astrid who decides to join a roller derby camp in the summer after she saw a roller derby game.  She expects her best friend to also sign up, but she does not. Astrid deals with disappointment, friends, lies and getting a lot of bruises.

I loved this book. I have read it two and a half times, and I find it really inspiring. Around the time of when I read this book for the first time, I was scared to roller skate. But after a year, I had read this book again, and I went roller skating. I realized how accurate Roller Girl is. The book was right, when skating, you get a lot of bruises. I recommend this book to fans of the graphic novel Brave.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find Roller Girl in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

Book Review: Love, Penelope

love penelope.jpgToday I Recommend Love, Penelope written by Joanne Rocklin and illustrated by Lucy Knisley.

Love, Penelope is an illustrated novel about a basketball loving girl named Penelope who can’t wait to welcome her new baby sister to the world.  Penelope is in fifth grade and lives with her two mothers with happiness. Penelope writes every day in her journal about her life, addressing them all to her soon to be baby sister.  Penelope and her friends face big problems and try to overcome them together, like fabrications (lies), school projects, heritage and family.

I loved this novel so much. Penelope is very lovable with the big words she uses and the jokes she and her friends tell.  One of my favorite things in this novel has to be the fact that one of Penelope’s friend owns a goat. The goat helps calm down the girls by letting the girls pet itself and get milked. This book was very enjoyable and I recommend this book to anyone because it covers a lot of topics that is very diverse.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ROCKLIN.

Book Review: The Giver

 

In the novel “The Giver”, Lois Lowry presents a unique dystopian community without any differences among the people. In this community, at the age of twelve, you are assigned a job based on your knowledge on a certain subject. This is the only job you will have throughout your life. This novel follows a 12-year-old boy named Jonas who hasn’t been assigned but selected to be the next Receiver of Memory. As Jonas receives his training from the present Receiver of Memory, he experiences many feelings that existed many generations ago, but not today.

All these feeling and memories were held inside everyone, until the community decided to change into Sameness. Sameness is total control over everything in order to make it the same. As Jonas and the Giver (present Receiver of Memory) continue with their training, Jonas wanted to make a difference. He wanted to change the community. He wanted everyone to feel want he felt. The Giver told him that if he crosses the boundary of memory, all the memories within him will spread throughout the community and the people.


Originally published in 1993, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry is a John Newbery Medal award winning book that consists of thrilling, exciting, and creative thoughts. I would recommend this book to readers that are interested in a new and innovative world where everyone is the same with no differences. This book makes you want to read more and more until there are no more pages.


A riveting utopian novel that’s expertly crafted.”  –  commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

Book Review: Pashmina

pashmina.jpgToday I recommend: Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani.

Pashmina is a graphic novel about a high-school aged girl in America named Priyanka. Her mother immigrated from India to America before Priyanka was born. Priyanka asks her mother many questions about her family and India and why she left, but her mother always tries to change the subject. Priyanka’s “uncle” usually spends time with Priyanka, but now he has  a baby to take with so Priyanka feels lonely. In her mother’s old suitcase, she finds a beautiful Pashmina that takes her to a fantasy India. In the real world, Priyanka wants to visit India, but her mother says no.

This graphic novel was beautifully drawn. I really enjoyed reading it. In the reality parts of the book, it is in black and white. But when she wears the Pashmina, Priyanka is transported to a fantasy India with loads of colors. I thought this was really interesting. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to read a graphic novel full of culture, with a really great story.

-Elizabeth, Teen blogger

You can find Pashmina in the Juvenile Graphic Novel Section at J GRAPHIC CHANANI.

Book Review: Hot Cocoa Hearts

Hot Cocoa Hearts.jpgToday I recommend Hot Cocoa Hearts by Suzanne Nelson.

Hot Cocoa Hearts is a fictional romance novel about a high school girl, Emery who is not a fan of the holidays (especially Christmas.) To her dismay, Emery has to work at her parent’s santa photo booth at the mall, dressed as an elf! At the mall between her shifts of work, she talks to Alex from the hot cocoa shop. The more she talks to Alex, the more she doubts that she hates Christmas as much as she says she does. He is practically the opposite of Emery, he is optimistic and loves the holidays. Also, Emery has a crush on Sawyer, a brooding member of a band.

I really actually loved this book. I normally do not read romance books, but this book sucked me in. Even though it is not currently near the holiday season, it was quite interesting. My favorite parts were when Emery sent and received secret santa gifts in her first period class at school. I recommend this book to anyone who wants a small, sweet love story.   

~Elizabeth, teen blogger

Book Review: Brave by Svetlana Chmakova

brave.jpg

Today I recommend: Brave by Svetlana Chmakova.

Brave is a humorous graphic novel about a middle school boy named Jensen. Everyday, Jensen must brave the difficult math class, bullies who follow him around, and getting along with his art club friends. On top of that, he deals with trying to find a partner for English class, and helping out his frantic friends who are in the newspaper team. Everyday, Jensen needs to be brave to survive the craziness at school.

I absolutely loved this graphic novel so much. It was humorous and the cartoonish art style is amazing! Every once in awhile, Jensen day-dreamed about being a hero, whether he was an astronaut, or stopping a zombie apocalypse from eating everyone at school. My favorite character was Jenny, the lead student of the newspaper team. She was hard working and dedicated to being in the newspaper team. When she was mad, she was “the wrath of the angels/apocalypse Jenny” and was drawn with fire in her eyes. (She was very mad at times.) The world of Brave and its characters overlapped with the book Awkward. However, Jensen was a background character in Awkward. As you can see, I loved this book and recommend this to everyone because it is a fun, quick read.

~Elizabeth, Teen Blogger

You can find Brave in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J CHMAKOVA.