Tag Archives: suspenseful

Book Review: I Am Princess X

I am Princess XToday I recommend: I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest.

I Am Princess X starts out with 2 best friends, May and Libby. They create a cool character named princess X who carries a samurai sword, lives in a haunted house and wears red chuck Taylors. Later, sad things happen and Libby and her mother pass away, and their princess X stories and drawings are accidentaly thrown out. A couple years later, May is lonely without her best friend, but then starts seeing princess X everywhere, stickers and patches and merchandise of all sorts, and there is a web comic of the princess. May is convinced that Libby did not actually die, but is waiting to be helped and found by May, writing clues in the webcomic for help. But is it actually true, is her best friend alive? Find out more once you read the book.

I absolutely loved this book very much. Most of it was in novel form, but the princess X webcomic strips were included throughout the story as comics. The comics were beautifully drawn and the words were very descriptive. I recommend this book to whoever likes suspense, mystery and comics.  

-Elizabeth N. Teen Blogger

You can find I am Princess X in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA PRIEST. This book was also on the Illinois Reader’s Choice Award List – Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award list in 2018.

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Book Review: One for Sorrow: A Ghost Story

one for the sorrow.jpgToday’s recommended read is: One for Sorrow: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn.

When unlikeable Elsie dies in the influenza pandemic of 1918, she comes back to haunt Annie to make sure she’ll be Annie’s best–and only–friend soon.

For readers who enjoy horror, but prefer it to be creepy rather than gory Mary Downing Hahn is one of the go-to authors. This page-turning ghost story is for those who enjoy historical settings, and those who enjoy Hahn’s other books.

You can find One for the Sorrow: A Ghost Story in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAHN.

~RP, aw

Book Review: The Amulet of Samarkand (Graphic Novel)

amulet of samarkand.jpgToday I recommend The Amulet of Samarkand A Bartimaeus Graphic Novel by Jonathan Stroud, Andrew Donkin, Lee Sullivan and Nicolas Chapuis.

This graphic novel is about a young magician boy and a powerful djinni, a type of demon named Bartimaeus. The graphic novel switches between both of their perspectives. The boy orders Bartimaeus to steal from a powerful magician, a thing that even he, a very powerful demon, has a hard time doing.

I thought this novel was really cool. It has magic, suspense and is a graphic novel. It is not too sad, but has a couple explosions. Bartimaeus, the demon, is very funny and witty, always trying to get out of doing the boy’s wishes. Bartimaeus is a lot like a genie except does not live in a tight space, has unlimited wishes, and has dark humor. The main boy is very ambitious and also very bitter about the past. I liked this novel a lot. I suggest this novel to who ever likes magic, suspense and of course, demons.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC STROUD.

Book Review: The Peculiar Incident on Shady Street

Peculiar Incident on Shady StreetIt’s time to highlight another book from the 2018-19 Battle of the Books list!

Tessa Woodward and her family have moved from Florida to Chicago.  Naturally, there would be changes that Tessa and her family would have to adjust to.  However, Tessa wasn’t expecting drawings to mysteriously appear in her sketchbook or her brother’s ventriloquist dummy to cry real tears.  If you like books that are a bit scary and would like to read how Tessa tries to uncover the truth to these mysteries and more, then pick up a copy of THE PECULIAR INCIDENT ON SHADY STREET by Lindsay Currie.

You can find this book on the Battles of the Books shelf during the 2018-19 season and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CURRIE.

~KF

Throwback Thursday: Watership Down

watership downIt’s Throwback Thursday again! Today Librarian Sandra recommends: Watership Down by Richard Adams.

In a constant struggle against oppression, a group of rabbits search for peaceful co-existence. Chronicles the adventures of a group of rabbits searching for a safe place to establish a new warren where they can live in peace.

A winner of the Carnegie Medal and published in 1972, this tale centered around rabbits is not as lighthearted as it might seem from the cover. This book is recommended for those in grades 6 and above. This book is another classic that was adapted into a movie (in 1978)!

Book Review: In the Shadow of the Sun

In the Shadow of the Sun by Anne Sibley O’Brien  

jacket

 What a timely story with all that is going on in North Korea.  This fast paced book gives a good inside peek at how North Koreans today are

living under the world’s most repressive regime.  Mia, her brother Simon and their father, an aide worker, are on a five day tour of North Korea.  Then their father is arrested for spying and Mia accidentally comes across photographs of North Korean slave-labor camps.  Mia and her brother realize that the only way to save their father is to get the pictures out of the country.  Now she and her brother must escape on foot through the forests of North Korea and into China before they are caught with the pictures.  An unforgettable story of courage, survival, and love for family.

Find this in our Juvenile Fiction collection under the call number J O’BRIEN.

Book Review: Jack and the Geniuses

Today I recommend: Jack and the Geniuses at the Bottom of the World by Bill Nye the Science Guy and Gregory Mone.

Traveling to Antarctica for a prestigious science competition, twelve-year-old Jack and his genius foster siblings, Ava and Matt, become caught up in a mystery involving a bill nye bookmissing scientist. (This is the first book in a series.)

You read that right! Bill Nye the Science Guy was one of the author’s for this book so as you might expect there is lots of science information, and inventions all throughout this book. It never feels slow or overwhelming, and the end-notes add even more interesting explanations. This is a fast paced mystery, and Jack is a humorous narrator. I’m looking forward to the next book in this series. You can find Jack and the Geniuses at the Bottom of the World in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NYE.

Book Review: Making Bombs for Hitler

making bombs for hitlerToday I recommend: Making Bombs for Hitler by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

When Lida and her sister are caught by the Nazis they are separated. Lida is sent to a slave labour camp and must work from dawn to dusk on bread and soup, without shoes and wearing only a thin dress. Even if she survives the war, will Lida ever see her sister again?

This book grabbed my attention right away and I couldn’t put it down. This is a fictionalized account of young Ukrainian Lida’s experiences in Nazi work camps but it is based on facts and interviews as explained in the excellent author’s note. It addresses all of the horrors of the Holocaust without being too graphic in its descriptions. The strength of Lida and her struggles will hook you and you’ll feel emotional as you root for her. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SKRYPUCH.

If Making Bombs for Hitler sounds interesting you might also enjoy: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (Juvenile Fiction J LOWRY). For other books about WWII check out: Book Review: Brave Like My Brother

~aw