Tag Archives: Siblings

Book Review: Paper Things

Paper Things.jpgPaper Things – Jennifer Jacobson

Paper Things is a thrilling novel by Jennifer Jacobson that tells the life of a nineteen-year-old Gage and his younger sister being homeless for six weeks. When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So, when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she must go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been “couch surfing,” staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama?

This novel will engender empathy and understanding of a serious and all-too-real problem. Jacobson’s story is poignant but never preachy. — School Library Journal


Paper Things by Jennifer Jacobson is a heart-touching novel and is originally published on February 10, 2015. Paper Things is a Rebecca Caudill 2019 nominee and has won several awards such as, the ILA Social Justice Literature Award for Fiction winner, and Hudson Bookseller’s Best of Summer 2015. I would recommend Paper Things to a reader that is looking for a thrilling novel.

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

You can find Paper Things on the Rebecca Caudill shelf during the 2018-19, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J JACOBSEN.

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Book Review: Love, Penelope

love penelope.jpgToday I Recommend Love, Penelope written by Joanne Rocklin and illustrated by Lucy Knisley.

Love, Penelope is an illustrated novel about a basketball loving girl named Penelope who can’t wait to welcome her new baby sister to the world.  Penelope is in fifth grade and lives with her two mothers with happiness. Penelope writes every day in her journal about her life, addressing them all to her soon to be baby sister.  Penelope and her friends face big problems and try to overcome them together, like fabrications (lies), school projects, heritage and family.

I loved this novel so much. Penelope is very lovable with the big words she uses and the jokes she and her friends tell.  One of my favorite things in this novel has to be the fact that one of Penelope’s friend owns a goat. The goat helps calm down the girls by letting the girls pet itself and get milked. This book was very enjoyable and I recommend this book to anyone because it covers a lot of topics that is very diverse.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ROCKLIN.

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Book Review: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

Vanderbeekers of 141st Street.jpgI recommend the book, “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” by Karina Yan Glaser. 

The Vanderbeeker family have been happily living in their Harlem brownstone apartment unit their landlord refuses to renew their lease.  Now, they have five days before Christmas to convince him to let them stay.  Each of the five siblings craft a different strategy to change his mind.

~ps

Throwback Thursday: The Boxcar Children

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner.

Henry, Jessie, Violet and Benny Alden are brothers and sisters – and they’re orphans. The only way they can stay together is to make it on their own. One night, during a storm, the children find an old red boxcar that keeps them warm and safe. They decide to make it their home.The Boxcar Children.jpg

The first book in the series serves as the introduction to these four plucky orphans and the boxcar that they turn into their home but the series quickly focuses on the children’s abilities to solve mysteries. The first book, The Boxcar Children, was published in 1924 and written by Gertrude Chandler Warner who went on to write the first 19 books in the series. Other authors have contributed the other books in this popular series which numbers over 130 books and continue to be published today!

You can find the Boxcar Children series in the Juvenile Mystery section at J MYSTERY WARNER.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: A Wrinkle in Time

Since the movie is being released on March 9th, I thought that it would only be fair to recommend A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle for this Throwback Thursday!

Meg and Charles Wallace set out with their friend Calvin in a search for their father. His top secret job as a physicist for the government has taken him away and the children search through time and space to find him.

First published in 1962, this book is an excellent example of classic science fiction. A Wrinkle in Time was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1963, and has gone on to inspire multiple movies. You can check out the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LENGLE, and you can check out the trailer for the new movie below.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Misty of Chincoteague

Misty of ChincoteagueFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry.

Set on Chincoteague Island, Virginia Paul and Maureen Beebe, a brother and sister, have their hearts set on owning a wild pony and her colt, who according to legend, are descendants of the Moorish ponies who survived a Spanish shipwreck long ago.

This classic is perfect for anyone who loves horses! A sweet tale of two children who eventually have a horse to call their own, Misty of Chincoteague was first published in 1947 and has been adapted as a movie. This book was also a Newbery Honor Book in 1948.

As for a local connection, author Marguerite Henry was a resident of Wayne, Illinois. Henry bought Misty and wrote the book about that horse. Each year, Misty and Henry would visit Wayne Elementary School and would celebrat the horse’s birthday with the children. http://prev.dailyherald.com/story/?id=245797

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HENRY.

~aw

Book Review: Slider

Slider.jpgToday I recommend Slider by Pete Hautman.

Hoping to win a cash prize in a pizza eating contest after racking up a tab on his mother’s credit card, David must juggle his competitive eating training with the responsibility of looking after his autistic younger brother.

This book has it all – suspense, friendship, and horrifyingly gross descriptions of competitive eating. It addresses David’s feelings of being the ‘forgotten’ middle child in his family without ever losing the humor that is necessarily part the book as David works to stretch his stomach and win a competitive eating contest in order to pay back his mom. I winced a little every time he decided to hide his mistake and lie a little more but that situation certainly added to the suspense of the story – you’ll want to know whether or not David can win right from the beginning!

You can find Slider in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAUTMAN.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car

chitty chitty bang bang.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming.

Two children persuade their father, an inventor, to purchase and restore an old car which turns out to have magical powers and leads its owners on a series of adventures.

Do you like going on adventures?  Did you ever wish that you had an object with magical powers?  If you answered yes to these questions, then Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming is the classic novel for you!  First published in 1964, this book has been adapted in a movie and has sequels written by another author who was inspired by this classic. In this book, you will learn how children convince their father to restore an old car.  During the restoration process, the family discovers that the old car has magical powers.  So, jump on into this book and go on a series of adventures with this fun family and their magical car!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FLEMING.

~kf

Throwback Thursday: A Long Way from Chicago

long way from chicagoFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck.

A boy recounts his annual summer trips to rural Illinois with his sister during the Great Depression to visit their larger-than-life grandmother.

Originally published in 1998, this book was awarded the Newbery Honor in 1999. The sequel, A Year Down Yonder, won the Newbery Medal for children’s literature in 2001. This historical fiction class is available in large print and as an audiobook! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.