Tag Archives: serious

Book Review: Illegal

illegal by eoin colferToday I recommend: Illegal by Eoin Colfer.

Ebo is alone. His brother, Kwame, has disappeared, and Ebo knows it can only be to attempt the hazardous journey to Europe, and a better life, the same journey their sister set out on months ago. But Ebo refuses to be left behind in Ghana. He sets out after Kwame and joins him on the quest to reach Europe. Ebo’s epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his family.

As the author notes although Illegal is a work of fiction all of the different portions of it are true, and events similar to what happen to Ebo happen to children, teens, and adults each day. This graphic novel is a compassionate look at the plight of refugees and immigrants. Readers will gain empathy for Ebo as the novel does not shy away from the terrible events that happen to him but his positive outlook lessens the overwhelming nature of the tragedies. The graphic novel would be an excellent teaching tool- to combine with history lessons or current events. Readers who enjoy graphic novel memoirs or graphic novel nonfiction such as Spinning by Walden or March by Lewis should check out this book.

You can find Illegal by Eoin Colfer in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC COLFER.

~aw

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Book Review: Ghost Boys

Ghost boys.jpgJerome, a twelve-year-old black boy, is shot.  A white officer said he had a gun.  No first aid is offered.  Jerome dies, however, his story does not end.  He comes back as a ghost and witnesses the events that unfold in the aftermath of his shooting and death.  To follow Jerome’s journey in the afterlife, pick up a copy of Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes.

~KF

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RHODES.

Book Review: Forever, or a Long, Long Time

forever or a longToday I recommend: Forever, or a Long, Long Time by Caela Carter.

Having shared so many foster homes that they are unable to trust that the family that has adopted them will last, Flora and her brother, Julian, are assisted by their new mother on a journey to resolve their past so that they can build a future.

This is a serious and thought provoking read that deals with topics such as foster care, families, and trauma as siblings Flora and Julian deal with the question of how they could be born if they don’t have a biological mother and how long their adoptive mother will be around (she says forever).

You can find Forever, or a Long, Long Time in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CARTER.

~aw

Book Review: Making Bombs for Hitler

making bombs for hitlerToday I recommend: Making Bombs for Hitler by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

When Lida and her sister are caught by the Nazis they are separated. Lida is sent to a slave labour camp and must work from dawn to dusk on bread and soup, without shoes and wearing only a thin dress. Even if she survives the war, will Lida ever see her sister again?

This book grabbed my attention right away and I couldn’t put it down. This is a fictionalized account of young Ukrainian Lida’s experiences in Nazi work camps but it is based on facts and interviews as explained in the excellent author’s note. It addresses all of the horrors of the Holocaust without being too graphic in its descriptions. The strength of Lida and her struggles will hook you and you’ll feel emotional as you root for her. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SKRYPUCH.

If Making Bombs for Hitler sounds interesting you might also enjoy: Number the Stars by Lois Lowry (Juvenile Fiction J LOWRY). For other books about WWII check out: Book Review: Brave Like My Brother

~aw

Book Review: The Crystal Ribbon

This week I read The Crystal Ribbon jacket
by Celeste Lim.

Li Jing is an 11 year-old girl with a special connection to the village guardian, the Great Golden Huli Jing- a five-tailed fox.  The family farm isn’t doing well, so they sell her as a bride to the 3 year-old son of the Guo family in another city.  Sadly, her new life is not what her family thought it would be. As her situation worsens, she realizes that the only thing to do is escape.  

This magical story had me hooked right away and I was desperate to know what would happen to dear Li Jing!  It also had me wondering: could I be that brave?  Would I be able to leave my family for a new life I knew would be awful, to save them?  Look for this book in our New Juvenile Fiction collection under the call number J LIM.

 

 

~am