Tag Archives: Schools

Throwback Thursday: The View from Saturday

The view from saturday.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsberg.

Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.

This is a classic that isn’t as old as most that we have featured- it was published in 1996 and won the Newbery Award. Still this heartwarming tale about being kind, civil, and inclusive is undoubtedly a classic. My favorite part of the book was that it was written from multiple perspectives which allowed me to feel as though I was getting to know each of the students. This is perfect for upper elementary school readers who enjoy realistic fiction, and for those who enjoyed the recent Newbery winner Hello Universe by Erin Kelly Entrada.

You can find The View from Saturday in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBERG.

~aw

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All’s Faire in Middle School

Today I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

All’s Faire in Middle School is a fictional graphic novel about Imogene, a girl who is homeschooled and whose parents work at a medieval faire. Her father acts as an evil night, and her mother runs a shop. Imogene is about to embark on her own journey, middle school! She doesn’t know if she will make any friends or fit in at middle school, but she tries anyway. She faces a strict science teacher, sort of teasing and bossy friends, homework, and many other things.

I really enjoyed this book. It was funny, and the art style is cartoonish and cool. I loved this book because it had a lot to do with medieval fairs, old english and the craziness of middle school. Imogene’s life and problems were often compared to folk tales and dragons. I suggest this graphic novel to who ever likes medieval times or graphic novels. Victoria Jamieson also wrote Roller Girl, a wonderful graphic novel about a girl learning how to roller skate.

~Elizabeth, Teen Blogger

You can find All’s Faire in Middle School in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

Book Review: All’s Faire in Middle School

All's Faire in Middle School.jpgToday I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

Homeschooled by Renaissance Fair enthusiasts, eleven-year-old Imogene has a hard time fitting in when her wish to enroll in public school is granted.

Fans of Jamieson’s graphic novel Roller Girl won’t be disappointed! Imogene is another strong female character, and the situations that she grapples with feel realistic even if growing up at a Renaissance Fair sounds far-fetched. Imogene deals with bullying and her desire to make new friends as she adjusts to going to middle school while also training to be a squire at the Ren. Faire. I recommend this to anyone who has enjoyed Awkward and Brave by Chmakova or Real Friends by Shannon Hale.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

~aw

Book Review: The Losers Club

losers clubToday we recommend: The Losers Club by Andrew Clements.

Alec, a sixth-grade bookworm always in trouble for reading instead of listening and participating in class, starts a book club, solely to have a place to read, and discovers that real life, although messy, can be as exciting as the stories in his favorite books.

From the author of Frindle and Extra Credit comes this school story that features Alec, an avid reader who often gets in trouble while reading his favorite books while NOT paying attention to his teachers or assignments. When his working parents need him attend the After School program, he plans a way to read uninterrupted by forming an unusual book club. And to avoid unwanted members from joining, he names the club “The Losers Club” to keep other students away.  Unfortunately, trouble follows him wherever he goes.  Readers will discover many favorite titles introduced in this novel.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CLEMENTS.

~ra

 

Book Review: The Best Man

the best manToday I recommend: The Best Man by Richard Peck.

Archer has four important role models in his life–his dad, his grandfather, his uncle Paul, and his favorite teacher, Mr. McLeod. When Uncle Paul and Mr. McLeod get married, Archer’s sixth-grade year becomes one he’ll never forget.

This book is an award winner! It was an American Library Association Notable for Middle Readers 2017, School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2016, and a Booklist Editor’s Choice for Middle Readers 2016. For readers that have enjoyed other works by Richard Peck, this book has the same focus on family and navigating childhood that many of his novels have. You’ll cheer for Archer as he grows up with help from all of his role models. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK or as an audiobook in the Juvenile Audiobook section at jCD FIC PECK.

~aw

 

Etiquette & Espionage by Gail Carriger

10874177Sophronia Temminnick is 14 and supposed to be concerning herself with becoming a lady, Sophronia however, would much rather concern herself with matters such as spying on house guests using her house’s dumbwaiter (it doesn’t end well). Sophronia’s mother decides the only thing to do with her is send her off to finishing school, Mademoiselle Geraldine’s Finishing Academy for Young Ladies of Quality. However, before she (and fellow new student Dimity) arrive at Mademoiselle Geraldine’s their carriage is attacked by flyaway men (like highway men, but they, you know, fly).

Upon arrival at her new (floating) finishing school Sophronia begins to realize she’ll be learning much more than just how to become a lady (although that is still part of the process). The school’s teachers include a vampire and a werewolf (who makes sure to keep his top hat on, no matter his form) and Sophronia quickly earns herself a nemesis in a far more accomplished student, Monique de Pelouse. In between learning how to curtsy properly, how to most effectively blush and flutter her eyelashes, and making sure to always have a handkerchief on her person (“not only a communication device, but it an also be dropped as a distraction, scented with various perfumes and noxious gases for discombobulation, used to wipe the forehead of a gentleman, or even bandage a wound, and of course, you may dab at the eyes or nose if it is still clean” (p124)), Sophronia is trying to figure out what Monique is up to and keep her mechanical dog Bumbersnoot fed a steady diet of coal.

Etiquette & Espionage is a fun steampunk story that isn’t too heavy handed with the steampunk. Sophronia gets stuff done and without much waffling on weather she should or not, such as scale balconies on the airship to get coal for her mechanimal, she just does it (which is quite refreshing). It’s not your typical beach read, but this book could definitely serve as an entertaining summer read.

Lisa