Tag Archives: realistic fiction

Book Review: Ramona Quimby, Age 8

It’s Throwback Thursday!  Today I recommend, Ramona Quimby, Age 8 by Beverly Cleary.

Ramona likes that she’s old enough to be counted on, but must everything depend on her? Mrs. Quimby has gone back to work so that Mr. Quimby can return to school, and Ramona is expected to be good for Mrs. Kemp while her parents are away, to be brave enough to ride the school bus by herself, and to put up with being teased by Danny the Yard Ape. In Ramona’s world, being eight isn’t easy, but it’s never dull! 

Ramona is a third grader, but I can still relate to so much of what she feels!  I remember listening to one of my favorite teachers read Ramona Quimby, Age 8 to my class in the third grade.  I always think of her when I read this book. If you need a laugh, I recommend checking it out, if you haven’t already read it.   When I need a feel-good book to lift my spirits, I like any of the books about Ramona.

Find it in our Juvenile Fiction collection under J CLEARY.

-AM

Book Review: The Lotterys Plus One

lotterys plus oneToday I recommend: The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue.

When Sumac Lottery’s estranged grandfather comes to live with her and her large family in their sprawling Victorian home, Sumac quickly realizes he’s not the easiest person to get along with. But can she help him find a home where he belongs?

Sumac has a large family, with six siblings, and two pairs of parents, PapaDam and PopCorn, and CardaMom and MaxiMom. When the estranged father of PopCorn comes to stay with the family, he struggles with the quirks and differences that the family celebrates. This is a touching story about the relationships between family members full of humorous word-play. There are also some nice illustrations throughout the text that help you keep track of the large and lively Lottery family. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DONOGHUE.

~aw

Book Review: Short

Today we recommend: Short by Holly Sloan.

Very short for her age, Julia grows into her sense of self while playing a munchkin in a summer regional theater production of The Wizard of Oz.

short

As you might imagine, being short has influenced Julie’s outlook on life, especially as a middle school student when she realizes she is several inches shorter than her classmates. Resisting her parents’ suggestion to participate in community theater, she reluctantly attends an audition and wins a role as a Munchkin in the summer production of The Wizard of Oz. As she befriends many people involved with the show, she gains confidence and self-acceptance and “grows” in unexpected ways. For those interested in theater and the “drama” associated with trying new things, this humorous tale will be inspiring. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SLOAN.

 

 

~ra

Book Review: The Best Man

the best manToday I recommend: The Best Man by Richard Peck.

Archer has four important role models in his life–his dad, his grandfather, his uncle Paul, and his favorite teacher, Mr. McLeod. When Uncle Paul and Mr. McLeod get married, Archer’s sixth-grade year becomes one he’ll never forget.

This book is an award winner! It was an American Library Association Notable for Middle Readers 2017, School Library Journal’s Best Books of 2016, and a Booklist Editor’s Choice for Middle Readers 2016. For readers that have enjoyed other works by Richard Peck, this book has the same focus on family and navigating childhood that many of his novels have. You’ll cheer for Archer as he grows up with help from all of his role models. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK or as an audiobook in the Juvenile Audiobook section at jCD FIC PECK.

~aw

 

Book Review: Lily and Dunkin

Today we recommend: Lily and Dunkin by Donna Gephart
lily and dunkin

Lily Jo McGrother, born Timothy McGrother, is a girl. But being a girl is not so easy when you look like a boy. Especially when you’re in the eighth grade.
Dunkin Dorfman, birth name Norbert Dorfman, is dealing with bipolar disorder and has just moved from the New Jersey town he’s called home for the past thirteen years. This would be hard enough, but the fact that he is also hiding from a painful secret makes it even worse. 
One summer morning, Lily Jo McGrother meets Dunkin Dorfman, and their lives forever change. 

For readers who enjoyed Wonder and Counting by 7’s , award-winning author Donna Gephart crafts a compelling dual narrative about two remarkable young people: Lily, a transgender girl, and Dunkin, a boy dealing with bipolar disorder. Their powerful story will shred your heart, then stitch it back together with kindness, humor, bravery, and love.

You can find Lily and Dunkin can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GEPHART.