Tag Archives: plot-driven

Throwback Thursday: The Borrowers

The borrowers.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

Miniature people who live in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

What could be more fascinating than the idea that there could be tiny people hiding in your own house- borrowing things and living just under your nose? This classic children’s novel was the inspiration for the Disney and Studio Ghibli movie The Secret World of Arrietty. First published in 1952 in the United Kingdom and 1953 in the United States- this book also won the British Carnegie Medal in 1952 which is awarded to the year’s most outstanding children’s literature by a British author. This is great for reader’s who enjoyed books like The Doll People by Ann M Martin.

You can find this classic in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NORTON.

~aw

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Book Review: The Wizard’s Dog

The Wizards DogToday I recommend: The Wizard’s Dog by Eric Kahn Gale.

When his master and best friend, Merlin, is kidnapped, there is nothing Nosewise the dog will not do to get Merlin back, even if it means facing the strange Fae people and their magic-eating worms, or tangling with the mysterious Sword in the Stone.

This book is hilarious- Nosewise, the wizard Merlin’s dog, is the narrator for the book and his point of view makes for an enjoyable read. A dog’s opinion on many things differs from that of the human companions he gains along the way to rescue his master Merlin- for example Nosewise believes that being the “poop-boy” who cleans the chamber pots is a huge honor while Arthur disagrees. This book is perfect for elementary school students who love dog books especially ones written from the point of view of the dog, and anyone who enjoys legend, and magical fantasy stories.

This is one of the fiction books for the 2018-2019 season of Battle of the Books. You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GALE.

~aw

Book Review: The Candymakers

The CandymakersToday I recommend The Candymakers by Wendy Mass.

This awesome novel is about four contestants competing at an annual candy making competition. Throughout the whole entire novel, there is perspectives of all of the main characters. There are many twists as the plot unfurls. From each perspective, you understand more and more.

This is one of my favorite novels of all time. I have read it twice, and it is so awesome. Nothing sad or scary happens, and it is very exciting. It makes my mouth water, and the novel is cleverly written. Because of this book, I have read many others of Wendy Mass’ novels including A Mango Shaped Space. I recommend this novel to anyone who likes the Book Scavenger series, candy, or hilarious books. There is a sequel to this novel, which is just as awesome to the first one.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

This book can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MASS.

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw