Tag Archives: nonfiction

Jazz Day

jazz dayToday I recommend: Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill.

A collection of poems recounts the efforts of Esquire magazine graphic designer Art Kane to photograph a group of famous jazz artists in front of a Harlem brownstone.

This is an interesting book of poetry, where all of the poems relate to the people and events that were a part of the photograph that inspired Roxane Orgill’s poetry. The author’s notes at the end include biographies of the musicians, and a set of foldout pages include a reproduction of the photograph. I recommend this for anyone interested in jazz music, as well as anyone who wants to read nonfiction without just reading a list of facts.

You can find Jazz Day in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j811.54 ORGILL.

~aw

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Book Review: Motor Girls

motor girlsToday I recommend: Motor Girls: How Women Took the Wheel and Drove Boldly into the Twentieth Century by Sue Macy.

Presents the first generation of female motorists who drove cars for fun, profit, and to make a statement about the evolving role of women.

This books offers a deeper look at the first women to drive automobiles, including in races and throughout the World War. It also offers some fun facts along the way such as the most ridiculous rules of the road (certain mayors in Illinois authorized the police to put wire or throw logs in front of speeding cars). With lots of pictures and sidebars filled with quick facts this nonfiction book is a great read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j629.283 MACY.

~aw

9/11

On this somber day, we have a couple of suggestions for books about the events of, and in remembrance of 9/11:

Nonfiction:

Saved by the Boats: the Heroic Sea Evacuation of September 11 by Julie Gassman (Juvenile Nonfiction j974.71 GASSMAN): Presents the heroic sea evacuation of September 11, 2001 with narrative text and vivid illustrations.

Cause and Effect: The September 11 Attacks by Robert Green (Juvenile Nonfiction j973.931 GREEN): Examines the September 11 terrorist attacks, discussing the events leading up to the attack, the impact on American society, and its lasting effect around America and the globe.

14 Cows for America by Carmen Agra Deedy (Juvenile Nonfiction j327.676 DEEDY): Maasai tribal members, after hearing the story of the September 11th attacks from a young Massai, who was in New York on that day, decide to present the American people with fourteen sacred cows as a healing gift.

Historical Fiction:

Nine, Ten: A September 11 story by Nora Raleigh Baskin (Juvenile Fiction J BASKIN): Relates how the lives of four children living in different parts of the country intersect and are affected by the events of September 11, 2001.

Somewhere Among by Annie Donwerth-Chikamatsu (Juvenile Fiction J DONWERTH): Eleven-year-old Emma’s life in Tokyo changes for the worse when she and her American mother, who is pregnant, must move in with her Japanese grandmother the summer before 9/11 changes the world.

I Survived the Attacks of September 11, 2001 by Lauren Tarshis (Juvenile Fiction J TARSHIS): When Lucas decides to skip school because he wants to discuss football with a firefighter friend of his father, he finds himself caught up in the terrorist attacks on New York City.

~aw

 

Book Review: The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Because this week is National Garden Week,51bdrofa1pl-_sx336_bo1204203200_ I would like to recommend
The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Young Readers
Edition
 by Michael Pollan.

“What’s for dinner?” seemed like a simple question—until journalist and supermarket detective Michael Pollan delved behind the scenes. From fast food and big organic to small farms and old-fashioned hunting and gathering, this young readers’ adaptation of Pollan’s famous food-chain exploration encourages kids to consider the personal and global health implications of their food choices.
I like learning about food and gardening so this book really had me thinking about what kind of food decisions I may make in the future.  I really like food, but I want to make good choices about what I eat.  What I like about this book is that author doesn’t try to tell you what you should eat, but he gives you a lot of information that you may not know about the food you find at the grocery store or at a restaurant.  For spreadpicexample, did you know that the corn we find at the store once looked very different!  I also like that the author uses a lot of photos and graphs to explain his research.   If you like learning about food or about how food gets to your grocery store, this is a very interesting book

Look for this book in our juvenile nonfiction section under the call number j394.12 CHEVAT.

Book Review: Claudette Colvin: Twice Towards Justice

Today we recommend: Claudette Colvin: Twice Towards Justice by Philip M. Hoose.

claudettePresents the life of the Alabama teenager who played an integral but little-known role in the Montgomery bus strike of 1955-1956, once by refusing to give up a bus seat, and again, by becoming a plaintiff in the landmark civil rights case against the bus company.
This book offers an engaging look at an almost unknown figure from the Civil Rights movement. This is a fairly long book but there are loads of pictures. Particularly nice are the sections of the books that are told from Claudette’s point of view. This book can be found in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j323.09 HOO.
~aw

On this Day: May 10th

On this day in 1869 the transcontinental railroad was completed. Two railroad companies, Union Pacific and Central Pacific, connected their railways in Promontory, Utah. This made it possible to travel by train across the United States!

You can learn more about the transcontinental railroad at http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/transcontinental-railroad-completed or by checking out books at the library such as:

iron men iron railsIron Rails, Iron Men, and the Race to Link the Nation by Martin W. Sandler: (Juvenile Nonfiction j385.097 SANDLER) In one great race between iron men with iron wills, tens of thousands of workers blasted the longest tunnels that had ever been constructed, built the highest bridges that had ever been created, and finally linked the nation by two bands of steel, changing America forever.

Book Review: Secrets of a Civil War Submarine

civil war subToday we recommend: Secrets of a Civil War Submarine: Solving the Mysteries of the H. L. Hunley by Sally M. Walker.

When the Union blockade of all ports in the South stopped supplies from reaching the Confederate Army, Horace L. Hunley decided to create a submarine that would be able to sneak up on enemy ships and blow them up. After many years of trial and error, the H. L. Hunley actually succeeded in sinking the USS Housatonic in February of 1864. But the submarine never returned to port, and her crew perished in the Charleston Harbor. This book presents the history of the Civil War submarine the H.L. Hunley, including the construction, mysterious sinking, recovery, and restoration.

This book was the 2006 winner for the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal. This book hooked me right from the start, and the numerous pictures, sketches, and maps made it easy to picture the submarine. This book is perfect for those interested in the Civil War or archaelogy. It is a great nonfiction book packed with information that avoids being dry or dull. You can find it in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j973.757 WALKER or as an audiobook in the Juvenile Audiobook section j973.757 WAL.

~aw