Tag Archives: magic

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of Platform 13

Secret of platform 13.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson.

Odge Gribbie, a young hag, accompanies an old wizard, a gentle fey, and a giant ogre on their mission through a magical tunnel from their island to London to rescue their King and Queen’s son who had been stolen as an infant.

This fantasy novel was one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 1998. The numerous magical and mythical creatures and the adventure make this perfect for anyone who loves fantasy stories. There are comic-like illustrations throughout the book, and it is full of humor. You could hand this to anyone who liked Roald Dahl!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J IBBOTSON.

~aw

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Book Review: The Witch Boy

The Witch Boy.jpgToday I recommend: The Witch Boy by Molly Ostertag.

In thirteen-year-old Aster’s family, all the girls are raised to be witches, while boys grow up to be shapeshifters. Anyone who dares cross those lines is exiled. Unfortunately for Aster, he still hasn’t shifted . . . and he’s still fascinated by witchery, no matter how forbidden it might be. When a mysterious danger threatens the other boys, Aster knows he can help — as a witch.

This graphic novel has a diverse cast of characters who inhabit a world where magic is divided between shapeshifting for the men and witchcraft for the women. Aster’s attempts to overcome the gender barriers blocking him from practicing the witchcraft that he is talented in are all about being true to yourself. Aster is a strong protagonist who never gives up and it is heartwarming to see him triumph and to see his family grow to accept him. This graphic novel is for fans of fantasy and those looking for titles for kids that address gender norms.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J Graphic OSTERTAG.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The BFG

the bfg.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The BFG by Roald Dahl.

Snatched from her orphanage by a BFG (Big Friendly Giant), who spends his life blowing happy dreams to children, Sophie concocts with him a plan to save the world from nine other man-gobbling cannibal giants.

Roald Dahl has written a lot of wonderful books for children such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or James and the Giant Peach but this one is my personal favorite. Sophie is an amusing main character, and the idea of the BFG creating happy dreams for children seemed like the perfect kind of magic to me. Originally published in 1982 this book has been adapted into a movie several times most recently by Disney in 2016. Fans of fantasy fiction should check out this classic!

You can find The BFG in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car

chitty chitty bang bang.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming.

Two children persuade their father, an inventor, to purchase and restore an old car which turns out to have magical powers and leads its owners on a series of adventures.

Do you like going on adventures?  Did you ever wish that you had an object with magical powers?  If you answered yes to these questions, then Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming is the classic novel for you!  First published in 1964, this book has been adapted in a movie and has sequels written by another author who was inspired by this classic. In this book, you will learn how children convince their father to restore an old car.  During the restoration process, the family discovers that the old car has magical powers.  So, jump on into this book and go on a series of adventures with this fun family and their magical car!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FLEMING.

~kf

Throwback Thursday: Howl’s Moving Castle

howlsFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones.

Eldest of three sisters in a land where it is considered to be a misfortune, Sophie is resigned to her fate as a hat shop apprentice until a witch turns her into an old woman and she finds herself in the castle of the greatly feared wizard Howl.

Most people will recognize as the title as the name of a movie from 2004 directed by Hayao Miyazaki. The movie is one of the highest grossing anime movies and it is based on this novel by Diana Wynne Jones. The book, Howl’s Moving Castle, was published in 1986. This book has all the enjoyable quirky humor and events that you find in the movie. This was such a fun read! Recommended for fans of the movie, and fans of  fantasy novels.

This book can be found in Juvenile Fiction section at J JONES.

~aw

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Looking for something fun to read?  Have you heard of Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson?

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Phoebe uses her one wish to make the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, her best friend.  Marigold Heavenly Nostrils is a majestic unicorn who isn’t used to the problems Phoebe faces, like kids thinking she’s weird, piano lessons, and what it means to be a friend.  Somehow a funny awkward girl and a self-absorbed mythical creature are able to find common ground and become friends!  If you find yourself laughing as much as I did, you will be happy to know that this is just the first in the Heavenly Nostrils series!

You can find it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels collection under J GRAPHIC SIMPSON.

Book Review: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis.

In 1950, “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by C. S. Lewis was published and a children’s classic was born.  In this fantasy, four siblings are evacuated from London during WWII and sent to the country to live with a professor.  While exploring his house, they discover a magical wardrobe which is a portal to the land of Narnia.  Read this exciting adventure story and then watch the movie!

You can find the book and the rest of the Chronicles of Narnia series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LEWIS and the movie in the Juvenile DVDs at jDVD FIC CHR.

~ps

Worlds Collide

world's collideAre you as excited as we are that Worlds Collide by Chris Colfer has arrived at the library?

In the highly anticipated conclusion to the Land of Stories series, Conner and Alex must brave the impossible. All of the Land of Stories fairy tale characters–heroes and villains–are no longer confined within their world!

With mayhem brewing in the Big Apple, Conner and Alex will have to win their biggest battle yet. Can the twins restore order between the human and fairy tale world?

Book Review: Frogkisser!

frogkisserToday I recommend: Frogkisser! by Garth Nix.

Princess Anya has a big problem: Duke Rikard, her step-stepfather is an evil wizard who wants to rule the kingdom and has a habit of changing people into frogs, and her older sister Morven, the heir, is a wimp–so with the help of the librarian Gotfried (who turns into an owl when he is upset), and the Royal Dogs, she must find away to defeat Rikard, save her sister, and maybe even turn Prince Denholm back into a human being.

This fantasy book has everything you could want: humor in the shape of hilarious talking dogs, the classic fantasy elements in the magic lip balm, newts, otters, a Good Wizard, and a strong main character! It also subverts a lot of fantasy tropes, there is no romance plot for our brave main character, Princess Anya. The book also has some interesting discussions about privilege and how laws should apply equally to everyone. This book is pretty hefty at 372 pages but if you love fantasy this is a book for you! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NIX.

~aw

Book Review: The First Last Day

Today we recommend: The First Last Day by Dorian Cirrone.

Eleven-year-old Haleigh Adams paints a picture with a mysterious set of paints she found and now she is stuck in a time loop, but when she realizes her parents have been keeping a secretfirst last day she and her new best friend Kevin must find the source of the magic paints and the secret of the time loop before it is too late.

Haleigh doesn’t want summer to end and finds herself repeating her last day of summer break over and over again. As you might expect, this turns out to be less fun than she thought especially when it turns out that lives are at stake. This is a really fun summer read, the writing is realistic (you know except for the time travel), and the tone is humorous. If you’re a fan of time-loops like in the movie Groundhog Day then this is the book for you! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CIRRONE.

~aw