Tag Archives: Humor

Throwback Thursday: Matilda

matilda.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Matilda by Roald Dahl.

Matilda, a brilliant, sensitive little girl, uses her talents and ingenuity to seek revenge on her crooked father, lazy mother, and the terrifying Miss Trunchbull, her wicked headmistress, and save her beloved teacher, Miss Honey.

Published in 1988, Matilda is another example of Roald Dahl’s work and another classic novel that has been released as a movie. The humor and the triumph of good over evil with the girl as the hero make this a book that has become a classic.

You can find Matilda in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: Fair Weather

Fair Weather.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday Ruth Anne recommends: Fair Weather by Richard Peck.

In 1893, thirteen-year-old Rosie and members of her family travel from their Illinois farm to Chicago to visit Aunt Euterpe and attend the World’s Columbian Exposition which, along with an encounter with Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell, turns out to be a life-changing experience for everyone.

Richard Peck passed away on May 23, 2018- but his books are well regarded and on their way to becoming classics. This is perfect for readers who enjoy historical fiction especially readers who live in and around Chicago and Illinois. Full of humor and fast-paced this is also a great inter-generational story that shows relationships between children and grandparents.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.

~ra & aw

Book Review: The Croc Ate my Homework

croc ate my homework.jpgA know-it-all rat, a naïve pig, a zebra with predators for his neighbors, and a crocodile family that just can’t seem to get it right….go on an adventure with the characters in The Croc Ate My Homework by Stephan T. Pastis.  This Graphic Novel will keep you laughing from the first page until the last one.

~KF

You can find this in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC PASTIS.

Throwback Thursday: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

charlie and the chocolate factory.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka’s mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way.

Most people will have seen at least one of the movies based on this classic novel but did you know that this book was first published in 1964, and that it has a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator? Much like the movies this book is great for anyone who enjoys humorous stories and has an active imagination.

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Book Review: Road Trip

road trip.jpgToday I recommend Road Trip, written by Gary and Jim Paulsen.

Road Trip is a fictional novel about a spontaneous road trip to rescue a Border Collie puppy. On the way, a father and his son end up inviting many other people on board, all ready to adopt an adorable puppy, and embark on an exciting journey. On this humorous and adventurous journey, the group faces many challenges on the highway, making the Border Collie pup seem farther and farther away. The main characters include a father who spontaneously does everything, his son who is fed up with his father, a Border Collie named Atticus who notices everything, and many other interesting characters with intriguing backstories revealed throughout the novel.

I enjoyed this novel because it is humorous, and not sad or scary. It was a quick read (114 pages) but an amazing story. My favorite parts of the book was Atticus’ point of view. He thinks he is not a dog, and realizes things before the humans do. His sections were interesting, but also summed up what had happened in the previous chapter, making me think about it differently. I recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys dogs, humor and road trips.

~Elizabeth, Teen Blogger

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PAULSEN.

Throwback Thursday: Where the Sidewalk Ends

Where the sidewalk ends.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Where the Sidewalk Ends: the Poems and Drawings of Shel Silverstein.

A boy who turns into a TV set and a girl who eats a whale are only two of the characters in a collection of humorous poetry illustrated with the author’s own drawings.

This was first published in 1974! I was never a huge fan of poetry as a kid but this collection really caught my attention and I remember it fondly. The wacky poems fit perfectly with the equally odd but playful illustrations. The book goes by in a breeze and is sure to elicit giggles. For those who enjoy poetry Shel Silverstein also wrote A Light in the Attic and Everything on It among others.

You can find Where the Sidewalk Ends in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j811.54 SIL.

~aw

Book Review: Gimme Shelter

Gimme ShelterToday I recommend: Gimme Shelter: Misadventures and Misinformation by Doreen Cronin.

The Chicken Squad uncovers mysterious remains while digging a meteor/storm shelter, and they stop work to investigate just as a big storm is approaching.

Do you like funny books about chickens?  If so, go on another adventure with The Chicken Squad.  Gimme Shelter: Misadventures and Misinformation by Doreen Cronin will have you laughing non-stop as Dirt, Sugar, Poppy, and Sweetie begin to build a storm Shelter.  Check out this book to see what The Chicken Squad uncovers as they begin their construction project!

~KF

Book Review: All’s Faire in Middle School

All's Faire in Middle School.jpgToday I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

Homeschooled by Renaissance Fair enthusiasts, eleven-year-old Imogene has a hard time fitting in when her wish to enroll in public school is granted.

Fans of Jamieson’s graphic novel Roller Girl won’t be disappointed! Imogene is another strong female character, and the situations that she grapples with feel realistic even if growing up at a Renaissance Fair sounds far-fetched. Imogene deals with bullying and her desire to make new friends as she adjusts to going to middle school while also training to be a squire at the Ren. Faire. I recommend this to anyone who has enjoyed Awkward and Brave by Chmakova or Real Friends by Shannon Hale.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Maniac Magee

Maniac MageeThis week for Throwback Thursday we recommend: Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli.

After his parents die, Jeffrey Lionel Magee’s life becomes legendary, as he accomplishes athletic and other feats which awe his contemporaries.

Published in 1990, this book by Jerry Spinelli was an American Library Association Children’s Notable Book in 1991 and won the Illinois Reader’s Choice – Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award in 1993. Readers who enjoy realistic fiction will love this classic!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SPINELLI.

Book Review: Slider

Slider.jpgToday I recommend Slider by Pete Hautman.

Hoping to win a cash prize in a pizza eating contest after racking up a tab on his mother’s credit card, David must juggle his competitive eating training with the responsibility of looking after his autistic younger brother.

This book has it all – suspense, friendship, and horrifyingly gross descriptions of competitive eating. It addresses David’s feelings of being the ‘forgotten’ middle child in his family without ever losing the humor that is necessarily part the book as David works to stretch his stomach and win a competitive eating contest in order to pay back his mom. I winced a little every time he decided to hide his mistake and lie a little more but that situation certainly added to the suspense of the story – you’ll want to know whether or not David can win right from the beginning!

You can find Slider in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAUTMAN.

~aw