Tag Archives: historical fiction

Book Review: Swing It, Sunny

swing itToday’s recommended read is: Swing It, Sunny by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.

It’s autumn and Sunny is back home and starting middle school.  Dale her brother has been sent to a boarding school to help with his drug problems.  Sunny misses him terribly and her fun is often interrupted by thoughts of him, thoughts that are often completely unrelated to what Sunny is doing.  When Dale returns home for the holidays feeling angry and betrayed by his family, it’s Gramps who helps Sunny see the sunny side of things again.  Through it all, Sunny tries to stay positive and learns we can’t always fix everything.

If you like this book you may like DRAMA by Raina Telgemeier or All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

~PH

You can find this book in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC HOLM.

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Book Review: Strongheart

strongheart.jpgToday’s recommend read is: Strongheart: Wonder Dog of the Silver Screen by Candace Fleming.

A German shepherd is transformed from Etzel, a police dog in Berlin, to Strongheart, a silent movie star that will need his best acting skills to prove himself innocent of attacking a girl.

Readers who love animals will be interested in this book based on the true story of the German Shepard dog, Strongheart, who was a silent film star in the 1920s. The illustrations throughout are charming and the inclusion of back-matter with photographs of the dog and explanations of which sections are facts and which are embellished should help satisfy the curiosity of young readers.

You can find Strongheart: Wonder Dog of the Silver Screen in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FLEMING.

~PS, aw

Book Review: One for Sorrow: A Ghost Story

one for the sorrow.jpgToday’s recommended read is: One for Sorrow: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn.

When unlikeable Elsie dies in the influenza pandemic of 1918, she comes back to haunt Annie to make sure she’ll be Annie’s best–and only–friend soon.

For readers who enjoy horror, but prefer it to be creepy rather than gory Mary Downing Hahn is one of the go-to authors. This page-turning ghost story is for those who enjoy historical settings, and those who enjoy Hahn’s other books.

You can find One for the Sorrow: A Ghost Story in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAHN.

~RP, aw

Throwback Thursday: Fair Weather

Fair Weather.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday Ruth Anne recommends: Fair Weather by Richard Peck.

In 1893, thirteen-year-old Rosie and members of her family travel from their Illinois farm to Chicago to visit Aunt Euterpe and attend the World’s Columbian Exposition which, along with an encounter with Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell, turns out to be a life-changing experience for everyone.

Richard Peck passed away on May 23, 2018- but his books are well regarded and on their way to becoming classics. This is perfect for readers who enjoy historical fiction especially readers who live in and around Chicago and Illinois. Full of humor and fast-paced this is also a great inter-generational story that shows relationships between children and grandparents.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.

~ra & aw

Throwback Thursday: Esperanza Rising

Esperanza Rising.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Esperanza Rising by Pam Muñoz Ryan.

Esperanza and her mother are forced to leave their life of wealth and privilege in Mexico to go work in the labor camps of Southern California, where they must adapt to the harsh circumstances facing Mexican farm workers on the eve of the Great Depression.

While not as old as many of the books that I have recommended for Throwback Thursday (this one was published in 2000) this book has many honors attached to it. Esperanza Rising was named an ALA Notable Children’s book in 2002, a YALSA Best Books for Young Adults in 2001, and the Pura Belpre Award in 2002. This is a great read for middle-grade children who are interested in historical fiction, and particularly those with in interest in the Great Depression.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RYAN.

~aw

Book Review: A Stitch in Time

a stitch in time.jpgToday I recommend: A Stitch in Time by Daphne Kalmar.

Donut’s father is tragically killed in an automobile accident and now her Aunt wants to take her from the small Vermont town where she grew up and bring her to Boston.  Donut refuses to go with her Aunt and runs away to an abandoned hunting cabin where she and her friend Tiny plan on how to keep her home.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KALMAR.

~Phyllis

Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Book Review: Beyond the Bright Sea

beyond the bright sea.jpgToday I recommend: Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk.

A baby girl washes ashore in a tiny skiff.  She is found and given the name Crow.  As Crow grows, she becomes increasingly curious about many things.  Where did she come from?  Why is there a light burning on a supposedly deserted island?  Is a famed pirate treasure hidden nearby?  If you are interested in finding the answers to these questions and more, read Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WOLK.

~KF

Throwback Thursday: A Long Way from Chicago

long way from chicagoFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: A Long Way from Chicago by Richard Peck.

A boy recounts his annual summer trips to rural Illinois with his sister during the Great Depression to visit their larger-than-life grandmother.

Originally published in 1998, this book was awarded the Newbery Honor in 1999. The sequel, A Year Down Yonder, won the Newbery Medal for children’s literature in 2001. This historical fiction class is available in large print and as an audiobook! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.