Tag Archives: fantasy

Book Review: The Phantom Tollbooth

phantom tollbooth.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster.

A bored young boy, Milo, drives his small electric car through a toy tollbooth and finds himself in the Land Beyond. A journey through a land where Milo learns the importance of words and numbers provides a cure for his boredom.

First published in 1961, The Phantom Tollbooth has been adapted into a movie as well as published as an annotated version. Lovely illustrations just add to the appeal of this witty book about a boy searching for a cure for his boredom.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J JUSTER, and the movie in the Juvenile DVD section at jDVD FIC TOL.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: Wizard of Oz

It’s time for another Throwback Thursday!

Did you know that the 1939 movie, The Wizard of Oz, was a book published in 1900 titled, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written by Frank L. Baum?  Read this American classic that follows Dorothy Gale through the Land of OZ and find out if the movie matches the book.  One difference is that Dorothy’s slippers are silver not ruby red!  When you finish the book, read The Road to Oz which tells the life story of the author! You can check out this classic and the other books in the Oz series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BAUM.

Book vs. Movie!

~ps

Book Review: Charlotte’s Web

It’s Throwback Thursday! Today I recommend: Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White.

charlotte's web

 

Wilbur, the pig, is desolate when he discovers that he is destined to be the farmers Christmas dinner until his spider friend, Charlotte, decides to help him.

 

First published in in 1952, Charlotte’s Web was named a Newbery Honor Book in 1953. This book was also turned into a movie twice! This charming story about the friendship between Wilbur, the pig, and Charlotte, the spider, will tug on your heartstrings! You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WHITE.

~aw

Book Review: NewsPrints

newsprints

Today I recommend: NewsPrints by Ru Xu.

Blue is an orphan who disguises herself as a newsboy. There’s a war going on, and girls are expected to help the struggling economy by selling cookies. But Blue loves living and working at the Bugle, the only paper in town that tells the truth. Blue struggles with her secret, and worries that if her friends and adopted family at the Bugle find out, she’ll lose everything and everyone she cares about.

This is a great graphic novel for anyone who enjoyed Compass South by Hope Larson. The setting is steampunk, which makes for a very interesting read. I really enjoyed the art style which reminded me a little of manga. The ending is a bit of a cliffhanger as it sets the scene for a sequel but this is still an enjoyable story. You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section under J GRAPHIC XU.

~aw

Worlds Collide

world's collideAre you as excited as we are that Worlds Collide by Chris Colfer has arrived at the library?

In the highly anticipated conclusion to the Land of Stories series, Conner and Alex must brave the impossible. All of the Land of Stories fairy tale characters–heroes and villains–are no longer confined within their world!

With mayhem brewing in the Big Apple, Conner and Alex will have to win their biggest battle yet. Can the twins restore order between the human and fairy tale world?

Book Review: The Wizard of Oz

It’s Throwback Thursday! Today I recommend: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank Baum.

wizard of oz

After a cyclone transports her to the land of Oz, Dorothy and her dog Toto are befriended by a scarecrow, a tin man, and a lion, who accompany her to the Emerald City to look for a wizard who can help her return home to Kansas.

Did you know that the Wizard of Oz movie was based on this book? Frank Baum wrote and published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900. The Library of Congress describes The Wonderful Wizard of Oz as “America’s greatest and best-loved homegrown fairy-tale,” (https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/oz/) This book would lead to numerous sequels beginning with The Marvelous Land of Oz. You can check out this classic and the other books in the Oz series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BAUM.

~aw

Book Review: Frogkisser!

frogkisserToday I recommend: Frogkisser! by Garth Nix.

Princess Anya has a big problem: Duke Rikard, her step-stepfather is an evil wizard who wants to rule the kingdom and has a habit of changing people into frogs, and her older sister Morven, the heir, is a wimp–so with the help of the librarian Gotfried (who turns into an owl when he is upset), and the Royal Dogs, she must find away to defeat Rikard, save her sister, and maybe even turn Prince Denholm back into a human being.

This fantasy book has everything you could want: humor in the shape of hilarious talking dogs, the classic fantasy elements in the magic lip balm, newts, otters, a Good Wizard, and a strong main character! It also subverts a lot of fantasy tropes, there is no romance plot for our brave main character, Princess Anya. The book also has some interesting discussions about privilege and how laws should apply equally to everyone. This book is pretty hefty at 372 pages but if you love fantasy this is a book for you! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NIX.

~aw

Book Review: The First Last Day

Today we recommend: The First Last Day by Dorian Cirrone.

Eleven-year-old Haleigh Adams paints a picture with a mysterious set of paints she found and now she is stuck in a time loop, but when she realizes her parents have been keeping a secretfirst last day she and her new best friend Kevin must find the source of the magic paints and the secret of the time loop before it is too late.

Haleigh doesn’t want summer to end and finds herself repeating her last day of summer break over and over again. As you might expect, this turns out to be less fun than she thought especially when it turns out that lives are at stake. This is a really fun summer read, the writing is realistic (you know except for the time travel), and the tone is humorous. If you’re a fan of time-loops like in the movie Groundhog Day then this is the book for you! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CIRRONE.

~aw

Nightlights

Nightlights by Lorena Alvarez

Every night, tiny stars appear out of the darkness in Sandy’s bedroom. She catches them and creates wonderful creatures to play with until she falls asleep, and in the morning brings them back to life in the whimsical drawings that cover her room.  One day, Morfie, a mysterious pale girl, appears at school. And she knows all about Sandy’s talent and her drawings.

First- this graphic novel has amazing illustrations! If you don’t want to read it, just pick it up to look at the pictures! Second- it was a creepier story than I thought it would be. I can’t wait to read the next one!  Look for it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels under
J GRAPHIC ALVAREZ.

 

~am

Mighty Jack

Mighty Jack by Ben Hatke

Mighty JackJack might be the only kid in the world who’s dreading summer. But he’s got a good reason: summer is when his single mom takes a second job and leaves him at home to watch his autistic kid sister, Maddy. It’s a lot of responsibility, and it’s boring, too, because Maddy doesn’t talk. Ever. But then, one day at the flea market, Maddy does talk–to tell Jack to trade their mom’s car for a box of mysterious seeds. It’s the best mistake Jack has ever made. What starts as a normal little garden out back behind the house quickly grows up into a wild, magical jungle with tiny onion babies running amok, huge, pink pumpkins that bite, and, on one moonlit night that changes everything…a dragon.

This graphic novel is a cool new twist on Jack and the Beanstalk. Lots of adventure and a little bit of magic makes me want to read the next book in the series! This book is recommended for grades 5-7. Look for it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels under J GRAPHIC HATKE. 

 

~am