Tag Archives: fantasy

Throwback Thursday: The Little White Horse

The Little White HorseFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge.

In 1842, thirteen-year-old orphan Maria Merryweather arrives at her ancestral home in an enchanted village in England’s West Country, where she discovers it is her destiny to right the wrongs of her ancestors and end an ancient feud.

This classic was originally published in 1946 and won the Carnegie Medal. Although the title sounds cute is meant for the older elementary school and middle school audience. The setting is England in 1842, and the detailed descriptions of everything from buildings to clothing to food really transports the reader to this time and place! This does lead to some very dated vocabulary which could be confusing for a young reader but could also be a great time to encourage readers to use a dictionary when they do not understand a word. I recommend this book to fantasy and animal lovers who are looking for a challenge.

~aw

Advertisements

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of Platform 13

Secret of platform 13.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson.

Odge Gribbie, a young hag, accompanies an old wizard, a gentle fey, and a giant ogre on their mission through a magical tunnel from their island to London to rescue their King and Queen’s son who had been stolen as an infant.

This fantasy novel was one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 1998. The numerous magical and mythical creatures and the adventure make this perfect for anyone who loves fantasy stories. There are comic-like illustrations throughout the book, and it is full of humor. You could hand this to anyone who liked Roald Dahl!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J IBBOTSON.

~aw

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

charlie and the chocolate factory.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka’s mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way.

Most people will have seen at least one of the movies based on this classic novel but did you know that this book was first published in 1964, and that it has a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator? Much like the movies this book is great for anyone who enjoys humorous stories and has an active imagination.

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Book Review: The Witch Boy

The Witch Boy.jpgToday I recommend: The Witch Boy by Molly Ostertag.

In thirteen-year-old Aster’s family, all the girls are raised to be witches, while boys grow up to be shapeshifters. Anyone who dares cross those lines is exiled. Unfortunately for Aster, he still hasn’t shifted . . . and he’s still fascinated by witchery, no matter how forbidden it might be. When a mysterious danger threatens the other boys, Aster knows he can help — as a witch.

This graphic novel has a diverse cast of characters who inhabit a world where magic is divided between shapeshifting for the men and witchcraft for the women. Aster’s attempts to overcome the gender barriers blocking him from practicing the witchcraft that he is talented in are all about being true to yourself. Aster is a strong protagonist who never gives up and it is heartwarming to see him triumph and to see his family grow to accept him. This graphic novel is for fans of fantasy and those looking for titles for kids that address gender norms.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J Graphic OSTERTAG.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Alice adventures in wonderlandSaturday January 27th is Lewis Carroll’s birthday so for this Throwback Thursday in honor of that I recommend: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll.

When a young girl falls down a rabbit hole, she discovers a strange and interesting world with fantastical, mad characters as she tries to find her way back home.

First published in 1865 this book has become a beloved children’s classic that has been adapted into numerous movies, plays, and languages! This book has never been out of print. It’s just as strange and delightful in book form as it is as a movie. If you like fantasy and love the movies you should definitely check out this book.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CARROLL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The BFG

the bfg.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The BFG by Roald Dahl.

Snatched from her orphanage by a BFG (Big Friendly Giant), who spends his life blowing happy dreams to children, Sophie concocts with him a plan to save the world from nine other man-gobbling cannibal giants.

Roald Dahl has written a lot of wonderful books for children such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or James and the Giant Peach but this one is my personal favorite. Sophie is an amusing main character, and the idea of the BFG creating happy dreams for children seemed like the perfect kind of magic to me. Originally published in 1982 this book has been adapted into a movie several times most recently by Disney in 2016. Fans of fantasy fiction should check out this classic!

You can find The BFG in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

If You Liked Jumanji (2017)…

You might have heard about the new Jumanji movie, and if you have then you probably know that it is about four teens getting sucked into a video game where they can’t go home until they beat the game! We love the “trapped in a video game” trope and have rounded up some books to share:

Click Here to Start by Denis Markell: Juvenile Fiction J MARKELL – When Ted inherits his uncle’s apartment “and all the treasure within,” he realizes the apartment is set up like a real-life video game and must solve the puzzles with his friends to discover the treasure.

Insert Coin to Continue by John David Anderson: Juvenile Fiction J ANDERSON – Middle-schooler Bryan wakes up to find that his life has become a video game, with bullies to beat, races to run, puzzles to solve, and much more at stake.

Heir Apparent by Vivian Vande Velde: While playing a total immersion virtual reality game of kings and intrigue, fourteen-year-old Giannine learns that demonstrators have damaged the equipment to which she is connected, and she must win the game quickly or be damaged herself.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car

chitty chitty bang bang.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming.

Two children persuade their father, an inventor, to purchase and restore an old car which turns out to have magical powers and leads its owners on a series of adventures.

Do you like going on adventures?  Did you ever wish that you had an object with magical powers?  If you answered yes to these questions, then Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming is the classic novel for you!  First published in 1964, this book has been adapted in a movie and has sequels written by another author who was inspired by this classic. In this book, you will learn how children convince their father to restore an old car.  During the restoration process, the family discovers that the old car has magical powers.  So, jump on into this book and go on a series of adventures with this fun family and their magical car!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FLEMING.

~kf

Goodreads Choice Awards Winner!

magnus chase ship of the deadThe Goodreads Choice Award Winner for the Middle Grade and Children’s Category is The Ship of the Dead by Rick Riordan! You can find this book at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RIORDAN.

From Goodreads:

WINNER 34,516 votes

The Ship of the Dead

by Rick Riordan (Goodreads Author)
A titan in the Middle Grade & Children’s category, Rick Riordan claims another victory for The Ship of the Dead. No stranger to mythological reimaginings, Riordan continues the story of a once-homeless teen and his epic transformation into one of Odin’s chosen warriors. This is the second time this series has been nominated, and it marks the seventh consecutive Goodreads Choice Award win for Riordan.

~aw