Tag Archives: fantasy

Book Review: Polly Diamond and the Magic Book

Polly Diamond and the Magic Book.jpgPolly Diamond and the Magic Book by Alice Kuipers is the story of a young girl, Polly, who discovers magic and has many misadventures.   Polly loves to write stories and begins to put them in a special book.  She soon discovers that everything she writes about will appear in real life.  Certainly, all of Polly’s dreams will come true.  Come to the library to check out a copy of this book to see if all of Polly’s dreams are as magical as they seem.

~KF

You can find Polly Diamond and the Magic Book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KUIPERS.

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The House with a Clock in its Walls

Have you read The House with a Clock in its Walls by John Bellairs? This haunting mystery (with a little fantasy thrown in) has been turned into a movie that will be released at the end of September 2018! We’re going to try and read the book before we see the movie- we still have some time!

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Borrowers

The borrowers.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

Miniature people who live in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

What could be more fascinating than the idea that there could be tiny people hiding in your own house- borrowing things and living just under your nose? This classic children’s novel was the inspiration for the Disney and Studio Ghibli movie The Secret World of Arrietty. First published in 1952 in the United Kingdom and 1953 in the United States- this book also won the British Carnegie Medal in 1952 which is awarded to the year’s most outstanding children’s literature by a British author. This is great for reader’s who enjoyed books like The Doll People by Ann M Martin.

You can find this classic in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NORTON.

~aw

Happy National Ice Cream Month!

Celebrate National Ice Cream Month by checking out these books with ice cream on the cover from our Juvenile Fiction section!

A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd JCD FIC LLOYD – The Pickles are new to Midnight Gulch, Tennessee, a town which legend says was once magic–but Felicity is convinced the magic is still there, and with the help of her new friend Jonah the Beedle she hopes to bring the magic back.

Sprinkle Sundays by Coco Simon J SIMON – When Allie and her mother move one town away after her parents’ divorce, Allie must find a way to stay close to her best friends Sierra and Tamiko.

The Chocolate Sundae Mystery by Gertrude Warner JPLWY WARNER – The Boxcar children investigate when ice cream and other items start disappearing from their favorite ice cream parlor.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

Book Review: The Wizard’s Dog

The Wizards DogToday I recommend: The Wizard’s Dog by Eric Kahn Gale.

When his master and best friend, Merlin, is kidnapped, there is nothing Nosewise the dog will not do to get Merlin back, even if it means facing the strange Fae people and their magic-eating worms, or tangling with the mysterious Sword in the Stone.

This book is hilarious- Nosewise, the wizard Merlin’s dog, is the narrator for the book and his point of view makes for an enjoyable read. A dog’s opinion on many things differs from that of the human companions he gains along the way to rescue his master Merlin- for example Nosewise believes that being the “poop-boy” who cleans the chamber pots is a huge honor while Arthur disagrees. This book is perfect for elementary school students who love dog books especially ones written from the point of view of the dog, and anyone who enjoys legend, and magical fantasy stories.

This is one of the fiction books for the 2018-2019 season of Battle of the Books. You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GALE.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Little Prince

The Little Prince.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

This is a charming illustrated book whose slim size can be rather deceiving as the tale is an allegory. First published in 1943, this book has often been assigned as a part of school reading and is now a part of the Great American Read 2018 run by PBS. This is recommended for anyone who enjoyed Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland or Barrie’s Peter Pan.

You can find this book in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA SAINT-EXUPERY.

~aw

Book Review: The Amulet of Samarkand (Graphic Novel)

amulet of samarkand.jpgToday I recommend The Amulet of Samarkand A Bartimaeus Graphic Novel by Jonathan Stroud, Andrew Donkin, Lee Sullivan and Nicolas Chapuis.

This graphic novel is about a young magician boy and a powerful djinni, a type of demon named Bartimaeus. The graphic novel switches between both of their perspectives. The boy orders Bartimaeus to steal from a powerful magician, a thing that even he, a very powerful demon, has a hard time doing.

I thought this novel was really cool. It has magic, suspense and is a graphic novel. It is not too sad, but has a couple explosions. Bartimaeus, the demon, is very funny and witty, always trying to get out of doing the boy’s wishes. Bartimaeus is a lot like a genie except does not live in a tight space, has unlimited wishes, and has dark humor. The main boy is very ambitious and also very bitter about the past. I liked this novel a lot. I suggest this novel to who ever likes magic, suspense and of course, demons.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC STROUD.

Throwback Thursday: The Little White Horse

The Little White HorseFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge.

In 1842, thirteen-year-old orphan Maria Merryweather arrives at her ancestral home in an enchanted village in England’s West Country, where she discovers it is her destiny to right the wrongs of her ancestors and end an ancient feud.

This classic was originally published in 1946 and won the Carnegie Medal. Although the title sounds cute is meant for the older elementary school and middle school audience. The setting is England in 1842, and the detailed descriptions of everything from buildings to clothing to food really transports the reader to this time and place! This does lead to some very dated vocabulary which could be confusing for a young reader but could also be a great time to encourage readers to use a dictionary when they do not understand a word. I recommend this book to fantasy and animal lovers who are looking for a challenge.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of Platform 13

Secret of platform 13.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson.

Odge Gribbie, a young hag, accompanies an old wizard, a gentle fey, and a giant ogre on their mission through a magical tunnel from their island to London to rescue their King and Queen’s son who had been stolen as an infant.

This fantasy novel was one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 1998. The numerous magical and mythical creatures and the adventure make this perfect for anyone who loves fantasy stories. There are comic-like illustrations throughout the book, and it is full of humor. You could hand this to anyone who liked Roald Dahl!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J IBBOTSON.

~aw