Tag Archives: families

Book Review: Love, Penelope

love penelope.jpgToday I Recommend Love, Penelope written by Joanne Rocklin and illustrated by Lucy Knisley.

Love, Penelope is an illustrated novel about a basketball loving girl named Penelope who can’t wait to welcome her new baby sister to the world.  Penelope is in fifth grade and lives with her two mothers with happiness. Penelope writes every day in her journal about her life, addressing them all to her soon to be baby sister.  Penelope and her friends face big problems and try to overcome them together, like fabrications (lies), school projects, heritage and family.

I loved this novel so much. Penelope is very lovable with the big words she uses and the jokes she and her friends tell.  One of my favorite things in this novel has to be the fact that one of Penelope’s friend owns a goat. The goat helps calm down the girls by letting the girls pet itself and get milked. This book was very enjoyable and I recommend this book to anyone because it covers a lot of topics that is very diverse.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ROCKLIN.

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Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Book Review: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

Vanderbeekers of 141st Street.jpgI recommend the book, “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” by Karina Yan Glaser. 

The Vanderbeeker family have been happily living in their Harlem brownstone apartment unit their landlord refuses to renew their lease.  Now, they have five days before Christmas to convince him to let them stay.  Each of the five siblings craft a different strategy to change his mind.

~ps

Book Review: Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth

sputnik's guide to life on earth.jpgToday I recommend: Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth by Frank Cottrell Boyce.

Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth by Frank Cottrell Boyce tells the story of a young boy named Prez who is staying with a foster family for the summer.  While staying with the family, a visitor comes knocking on the door.  Prez sees the visitor as one thing, while many others see something else.  The visitor, named Sputnik, works with Prez to, hopefully, write a guide to life on earth and save it from destruction.  If you like science fiction novels, this book is a must read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J COTTRELL BOYCE.

~kf

Throwback Thursday: A Wrinkle in Time

Since the movie is being released on March 9th, I thought that it would only be fair to recommend A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle for this Throwback Thursday!

Meg and Charles Wallace set out with their friend Calvin in a search for their father. His top secret job as a physicist for the government has taken him away and the children search through time and space to find him.

First published in 1962, this book is an excellent example of classic science fiction. A Wrinkle in Time was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1963, and has gone on to inspire multiple movies. You can check out the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LENGLE, and you can check out the trailer for the new movie below.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

charlie and the chocolate factory.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka’s mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way.

Most people will have seen at least one of the movies based on this classic novel but did you know that this book was first published in 1964, and that it has a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator? Much like the movies this book is great for anyone who enjoys humorous stories and has an active imagination.

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Book Review: Castle in the Stars

castle in the stars.jpgToday I recommend: Castle in the Stars: The Space Race of 1869 by Alex Alice.

In search of the mysterious element known as aether, Claire Dulac flew her hot air balloon toward the edge of our stratosphere―and never returned. One year after his mother’s disappearance, Seraphin and his father are delivered a tantalizing clue: a letter from an unknown sender who claims to have Claire’s lost logbook. The letter summons them to a Bavarian castle, where an ambitious young king dreams of flying the skies in a ship powered by aether. But within the castle walls, danger lurks―there are those who would stop at nothing to conquer the stars.

Science fiction and steampunk fans rejoice! This graphic novel has gorgeous and super detailed illustrations of aetherships and other technological marvels. Seraphin quickly recruits some friends to form the Knights of the Aether to protect King Ludwig while also searching for a way to make it to the stars! There is lots of banter, and a quick pace to the adventures but it does end on quite a cliff-hanger. This is perfect for anyone who likes science fiction, Jules Verne, or adventure stories who don’t mind the quirky steampunk setting!

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC ALEX.

~aw

Book Review: The Witch Boy

The Witch Boy.jpgToday I recommend: The Witch Boy by Molly Ostertag.

In thirteen-year-old Aster’s family, all the girls are raised to be witches, while boys grow up to be shapeshifters. Anyone who dares cross those lines is exiled. Unfortunately for Aster, he still hasn’t shifted . . . and he’s still fascinated by witchery, no matter how forbidden it might be. When a mysterious danger threatens the other boys, Aster knows he can help — as a witch.

This graphic novel has a diverse cast of characters who inhabit a world where magic is divided between shapeshifting for the men and witchcraft for the women. Aster’s attempts to overcome the gender barriers blocking him from practicing the witchcraft that he is talented in are all about being true to yourself. Aster is a strong protagonist who never gives up and it is heartwarming to see him triumph and to see his family grow to accept him. This graphic novel is for fans of fantasy and those looking for titles for kids that address gender norms.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J Graphic OSTERTAG.

~aw

Book Review: Beyond the Bright Sea

beyond the bright sea.jpgToday I recommend: Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk.

A baby girl washes ashore in a tiny skiff.  She is found and given the name Crow.  As Crow grows, she becomes increasingly curious about many things.  Where did she come from?  Why is there a light burning on a supposedly deserted island?  Is a famed pirate treasure hidden nearby?  If you are interested in finding the answers to these questions and more, read Beyond the Bright Sea by Lauren Wolk.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WOLK.

~KF