Tag Archives: Classics

Throwback Thursday: The View from Saturday

The view from saturday.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsberg.

Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.

This is a classic that isn’t as old as most that we have featured- it was published in 1996 and won the Newbery Award. Still this heartwarming tale about being kind, civil, and inclusive is undoubtedly a classic. My favorite part of the book was that it was written from multiple perspectives which allowed me to feel as though I was getting to know each of the students. This is perfect for upper elementary school readers who enjoy realistic fiction, and for those who enjoyed the recent Newbery winner Hello Universe by Erin Kelly Entrada.

You can find The View from Saturday in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBERG.

~aw

Advertisements

Throwback Thursday: The Little White Horse

The Little White HorseFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge.

In 1842, thirteen-year-old orphan Maria Merryweather arrives at her ancestral home in an enchanted village in England’s West Country, where she discovers it is her destiny to right the wrongs of her ancestors and end an ancient feud.

This classic was originally published in 1946 and won the Carnegie Medal. Although the title sounds cute is meant for the older elementary school and middle school audience. The setting is England in 1842, and the detailed descriptions of everything from buildings to clothing to food really transports the reader to this time and place! This does lead to some very dated vocabulary which could be confusing for a young reader but could also be a great time to encourage readers to use a dictionary when they do not understand a word. I recommend this book to fantasy and animal lovers who are looking for a challenge.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Tower Treasure

the tower treasure'.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Tower Treasure by Franklin Dixon.

The robbery of the treasure in the tower proves to be an exciting challenge to Frank and Joe. Frank and Joe attempt to foil a ruthless espionage ring in their effort to sabotage the United States space program.

After highlighting Nancy Drew, it seemed like the right time to highlight the Hardy Boy Mysteries. These classic mysteries were first published in 1987, and featured brothers Frank and Joe as they worked to solve cases.

You can find the original Hardy Boy mysteries, and newer adaptations of these sleuths in the Juvenile Mystery section at J DIXON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of Platform 13

Secret of platform 13.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson.

Odge Gribbie, a young hag, accompanies an old wizard, a gentle fey, and a giant ogre on their mission through a magical tunnel from their island to London to rescue their King and Queen’s son who had been stolen as an infant.

This fantasy novel was one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 1998. The numerous magical and mythical creatures and the adventure make this perfect for anyone who loves fantasy stories. There are comic-like illustrations throughout the book, and it is full of humor. You could hand this to anyone who liked Roald Dahl!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J IBBOTSON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of the Old Clock

secret of the old clockFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of the Old Clock by Carolyn Keene.

Nancy Drew’s keen mind is tested when she searches for a missing will.

This is the first of the Nancy Drew mysteries! Mildred Wirt Benson who was from Iowa wrote this story in 1930 under the pseudnym Carolyn Keene. She would write nearly two dozen stories featuring Nancy Drew. The Nancy Drew mysteries have sold over 200 million copies and have been translated into 25 languages (UI Press release 2007)! This classic mysteries series is great for those who enjoy the Boxcar Children or the Hardy Boy mysteries.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Mystery section at J KEENE.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: A Little Princess

A Little Princess.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday we’re highlighting: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin’s London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

This book was first published in 1905 (and was an expanded version of a short story that had been published in 1888), and has been adapted into many different movies – one of the most well known stars Shirley Temple.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Boxcar Children

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner.

Henry, Jessie, Violet and Benny Alden are brothers and sisters – and they’re orphans. The only way they can stay together is to make it on their own. One night, during a storm, the children find an old red boxcar that keeps them warm and safe. They decide to make it their home.The Boxcar Children.jpg

The first book in the series serves as the introduction to these four plucky orphans and the boxcar that they turn into their home but the series quickly focuses on the children’s abilities to solve mysteries. The first book, The Boxcar Children, was published in 1924 and written by Gertrude Chandler Warner who went on to write the first 19 books in the series. Other authors have contributed the other books in this popular series which numbers over 130 books and continue to be published today!

You can find the Boxcar Children series in the Juvenile Mystery section at J MYSTERY WARNER.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Hatchet

HatchetFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness, learning to survive initially with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents’ divorce.

First published in 1987, this book has made countless school reading lists and was an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book in 1988. You can’t look away from this book as Brian struggles to survive on his own. This is a gripping adventure story, and is most suitable for those older children who have moved past the I Survived series by Tarshis.

You can find Hatchet in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PAULSEN.

~aw