Tag Archives: Classics

Throwback Thursday: The Call of the Wild

call of the wild.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Call of the Wild by Jack London.

The adventures of an unusual dog, forcibly taken to the Klondike gold field, where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

Originally published in 1903, this classic was quickly adapted into a movie in 1923, and has been adapted into a movie several other times since then. This classic is for readers who enjoy more tense drama, it is not a standard happy animal story.

You can find The Call of the Wild in the  Juvenile Fiction section at J LONDON.

~aw

 

 

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Throwback Thursday: My Side of the Mountain

my side of the mountainFor this Throwback Thursday the recommended read is: My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George.

A young boy relates his adventures during the year he spends living alone in the Catskill Mountains including his struggle for survival, his dependence on nature, his animal friends, and his ultimate realization that he needs human companionship.

First published in 1959, this classic tale of survival and adventure was a Newbery honor book in 1960. The sequel to this book, On the Far Side of the Mountain was published many years later in 1990. This classic is perfect for reader’s who enjoy survival stories like Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

You can find My Side of the Mountain  in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GEORGE.

~PS, aw

Throwback Thursday: Matilda

matilda.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Matilda by Roald Dahl.

Matilda, a brilliant, sensitive little girl, uses her talents and ingenuity to seek revenge on her crooked father, lazy mother, and the terrifying Miss Trunchbull, her wicked headmistress, and save her beloved teacher, Miss Honey.

Published in 1988, Matilda is another example of Roald Dahl’s work and another classic novel that has been released as a movie. The humor and the triumph of good over evil with the girl as the hero make this a book that has become a classic.

You can find Matilda in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Fair Weather

Fair Weather.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday Ruth Anne recommends: Fair Weather by Richard Peck.

In 1893, thirteen-year-old Rosie and members of her family travel from their Illinois farm to Chicago to visit Aunt Euterpe and attend the World’s Columbian Exposition which, along with an encounter with Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell, turns out to be a life-changing experience for everyone.

Richard Peck passed away on May 23, 2018- but his books are well regarded and on their way to becoming classics. This is perfect for readers who enjoy historical fiction especially readers who live in and around Chicago and Illinois. Full of humor and fast-paced this is also a great inter-generational story that shows relationships between children and grandparents.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.

~ra & aw

Throwback Thursday: Island of the Blue Dolphins

Island of the blue dolphins.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell.

Left alone on a beautiful but isolated island, a young Indian girl spends eighteen years, not only merely surviving through her enormous courage and self-reliance, but also finding a measure of happiness in her solitary life.

Originally published in 1960, this classic novel was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1961. This book has also been a part of the Battle of the Books program at the Bartlett Public Library. This story of survival and resiliency is great for late elementary school readers who enjoyed books such as Hatchet by Gary Paulsen or Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ODELL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Julie of the Wolves

Julie of the wolves.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George.

While running away from home and an unwanted marriage, a thirteen-year-old Eskimo girl becomes lost on the North Slope of Alaska and is befriended by a wolf pack.

This classic novel was originally published in 1972, and was followed by two sequels Julie (in 1994) and Julie’s Wolf Pack (in 1997). The book was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1973. This book is for readers who enjoy adventure and survival stories as Julie (who prefers her Eskimo name Miyax) struggles to learn how to survive on the tundra by learning more about the wolf pack.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GEORGE.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Borrowers

The borrowers.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

Miniature people who live in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

What could be more fascinating than the idea that there could be tiny people hiding in your own house- borrowing things and living just under your nose? This classic children’s novel was the inspiration for the Disney and Studio Ghibli movie The Secret World of Arrietty. First published in 1952 in the United Kingdom and 1953 in the United States- this book also won the British Carnegie Medal in 1952 which is awarded to the year’s most outstanding children’s literature by a British author. This is great for reader’s who enjoyed books like The Doll People by Ann M Martin.

You can find this classic in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NORTON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Wind in the Willows

the wind in the willows.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame.

The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside – Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger. When Mr. Toad gets a new motor car, he gets them all in trouble.

First published in 1908 – this classic children’s novel is for readers who like animal stories full of antics. This classic has been adapted in various stage plays, musicals, and, of course, movies! You can find it at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GRAHAME.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Little Prince

The Little Prince.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

This is a charming illustrated book whose slim size can be rather deceiving as the tale is an allegory. First published in 1943, this book has often been assigned as a part of school reading and is now a part of the Great American Read 2018 run by PBS. This is recommended for anyone who enjoyed Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland or Barrie’s Peter Pan.

You can find this book in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA SAINT-EXUPERY.

~aw