Tag Archives: Classics

Throwback Thursday: The Wind in the Willows

the wind in the willows.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame.

The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside – Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger. When Mr. Toad gets a new motor car, he gets them all in trouble.

First published in 1908 – this classic children’s novel is for readers who like animal stories full of antics. This classic has been adapted in various stage plays, musicals, and, of course, movies! You can find it at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GRAHAME.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Little Prince

The Little Prince.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

This is a charming illustrated book whose slim size can be rather deceiving as the tale is an allegory. First published in 1943, this book has often been assigned as a part of school reading and is now a part of the Great American Read 2018 run by PBS. This is recommended for anyone who enjoyed Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland or Barrie’s Peter Pan.

You can find this book in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA SAINT-EXUPERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Westing Game

The westing game.jpgAfter a short break, we’re back! For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin.

The mysterious death of an eccentric millionaire brings together an unlikely assortment of heirs who must uncover the circumstances of his death before they can claim their inheritance.

This is fun classic mystery- first published in 1978! This book also won the Newbery Medal Award in 1979. There is a really enjoyable plot especially interesting as every character is competing to win the inheritance money. This is perfect for mystery readers and those who enjoyed books such as The Mysterious Benedict Society and From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E . Frankweiler.

You can find it in the Juvenile Mystery section at J RASKIN.

~aw

Book Review: The Giver

 

In the novel “The Giver”, Lois Lowry presents a unique dystopian community without any differences among the people. In this community, at the age of twelve, you are assigned a job based on your knowledge on a certain subject. This is the only job you will have throughout your life. This novel follows a 12-year-old boy named Jonas who hasn’t been assigned but selected to be the next Receiver of Memory. As Jonas receives his training from the present Receiver of Memory, he experiences many feelings that existed many generations ago, but not today.

All these feeling and memories were held inside everyone, until the community decided to change into Sameness. Sameness is total control over everything in order to make it the same. As Jonas and the Giver (present Receiver of Memory) continue with their training, Jonas wanted to make a difference. He wanted to change the community. He wanted everyone to feel want he felt. The Giver told him that if he crosses the boundary of memory, all the memories within him will spread throughout the community and the people.


Originally published in 1993, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry is a John Newbery Medal award winning book that consists of thrilling, exciting, and creative thoughts. I would recommend this book to readers that are interested in a new and innovative world where everyone is the same with no differences. This book makes you want to read more and more until there are no more pages.


A riveting utopian novel that’s expertly crafted.”  –  commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

Throwback Thursday: The View from Saturday

The view from saturday.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The View from Saturday by E. L. Konigsberg.

Four students, with their own individual stories, develop a special bond and attract the attention of their teacher, a paraplegic, who chooses them to represent their sixth-grade class in the Academic Bowl competition.

This is a classic that isn’t as old as most that we have featured- it was published in 1996 and won the Newbery Award. Still this heartwarming tale about being kind, civil, and inclusive is undoubtedly a classic. My favorite part of the book was that it was written from multiple perspectives which allowed me to feel as though I was getting to know each of the students. This is perfect for upper elementary school readers who enjoy realistic fiction, and for those who enjoyed the recent Newbery winner Hello Universe by Erin Kelly Entrada.

You can find The View from Saturday in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBERG.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Little White Horse

The Little White HorseFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge.

In 1842, thirteen-year-old orphan Maria Merryweather arrives at her ancestral home in an enchanted village in England’s West Country, where she discovers it is her destiny to right the wrongs of her ancestors and end an ancient feud.

This classic was originally published in 1946 and won the Carnegie Medal. Although the title sounds cute is meant for the older elementary school and middle school audience. The setting is England in 1842, and the detailed descriptions of everything from buildings to clothing to food really transports the reader to this time and place! This does lead to some very dated vocabulary which could be confusing for a young reader but could also be a great time to encourage readers to use a dictionary when they do not understand a word. I recommend this book to fantasy and animal lovers who are looking for a challenge.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Tower Treasure

the tower treasure'.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Tower Treasure by Franklin Dixon.

The robbery of the treasure in the tower proves to be an exciting challenge to Frank and Joe. Frank and Joe attempt to foil a ruthless espionage ring in their effort to sabotage the United States space program.

After highlighting Nancy Drew, it seemed like the right time to highlight the Hardy Boy Mysteries. These classic mysteries were first published in 1987, and featured brothers Frank and Joe as they worked to solve cases.

You can find the original Hardy Boy mysteries, and newer adaptations of these sleuths in the Juvenile Mystery section at J DIXON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of Platform 13

Secret of platform 13.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of Platform 13 by Eva Ibbotson.

Odge Gribbie, a young hag, accompanies an old wizard, a gentle fey, and a giant ogre on their mission through a magical tunnel from their island to London to rescue their King and Queen’s son who had been stolen as an infant.

This fantasy novel was one of School Library Journal’s Best Books of 1998. The numerous magical and mythical creatures and the adventure make this perfect for anyone who loves fantasy stories. There are comic-like illustrations throughout the book, and it is full of humor. You could hand this to anyone who liked Roald Dahl!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J IBBOTSON.

~aw