Tag Archives: Books

June 20th

On this day, June 20th in 1975 the movie Jaws was released in theaters!

“The story of a great white shark that terrorizes a New England resort town became an instant blockbuster and the highest-grossing film in movie history until it was bested by 1977’s Star Wars. Jaws was nominated for an Academy Award in the Best Picture category and took home three Oscars, for Best Film Editing, Best Original Score and Best Sound. The film, a breakthrough for director Spielberg, then 27 years old, spawned three sequels.” http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/jaws-released-2

You can borrow Jaws from the library, or learn more about sharks with books from the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j597.3.

June 16th

On June 16th, 1963 Soviet Cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman to travel into space. She spent 71 hours in space and completed 48 orbits before returning to earth. History.com notes that:

“The United States screened a group of female pilots in 1959 and 1960 for possible astronaut training but later decided to restrict astronaut qualification to men. The first American woman in space was astronaut and physicist Sally Ride, who served as mission specialist on a flight of the space shuttle Challenger in 1983.” http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-woman-in-space

 

almost astronautsYou can learn more about the women who almost became astronauts in Almost Astronauts: the Story of the Mercury 13 Women by Tanya Lee Stone. You can find this book in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j629.45 STO.

If you like Captain Underpants:

We’ve had a lot of requests for Captain Underpants books since the movie was released! The books are as popular as ever and are constantly being borrowed and returned. If you’re looking for something to read while you wait then you should consider some of these similarly wacky, gross, and humorous books:

Franny K. Stein, Mad Scientist series by Jim Benton (Juvenile Fiction J BENTON): The first book is Lunch Walks Among Us. Franny K. Stein is a mad scientist who prefers all things spooky and creepy, but when she has trouble making friends at her new school she experiments with fitting in–which works until a monster erupts from the trashcan.

Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute by Jarrett Krosoczka is the first graphic novel in the Lunch Lady series, and can be found in our Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC KRO. As if slinging hash in the school cafeteria isn’t exciting enough, Lunch Lady has a secret life as a crime-fighting superhero! And she’s noticed that something about the new substitute teacher, Mr. Pasteur, just doesn’t seem right. But while Lunch Lady is busy investigating Mr. Pasteur, students Hector, Terrence, and Dee are investigating her.

Pilot and Huxley by Dan McGuiness is another humorous graphic novel that can be found in our Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC MCG. Best buddies Pilot & Huxley get zapped to another dimension by aliens seeking to enslave the planet Earth, which totally ruins their day! That’s when things get weird …

~aw

June 12th

anne frankOn this day in 1942, Anne Frank received a diary for her thirteenth birthday. Anne Frank was a young Jewish girl living in Amsterdam during World War II. One month later, she and her family would go into hiding. Unfortunately, Anne Frank and her family would be discovered by the Gestapo in 1944 and sent to concentration camps.

Anne’s father survived Auschwitz and published Anne’s diary in 1947 as The Diary of a Young Girl. The book has been translated into more than 60 languages. (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/anne-frank-receives-a-diary)

You can learn more about Anne Frank as well as read her diary here at the library. You can find biographies in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at jBiog. Frank.

Book Review: The Omnivore’s Dilemma

Because this week is National Garden Week,51bdrofa1pl-_sx336_bo1204203200_ I would like to recommend
The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Young Readers
Edition
 by Michael Pollan.

“What’s for dinner?” seemed like a simple question—until journalist and supermarket detective Michael Pollan delved behind the scenes. From fast food and big organic to small farms and old-fashioned hunting and gathering, this young readers’ adaptation of Pollan’s famous food-chain exploration encourages kids to consider the personal and global health implications of their food choices.
I like learning about food and gardening so this book really had me thinking about what kind of food decisions I may make in the future.  I really like food, but I want to make good choices about what I eat.  What I like about this book is that author doesn’t try to tell you what you should eat, but he gives you a lot of information that you may not know about the food you find at the grocery store or at a restaurant.  For spreadpicexample, did you know that the corn we find at the store once looked very different!  I also like that the author uses a lot of photos and graphs to explain his research.   If you like learning about food or about how food gets to your grocery store, this is a very interesting book

Look for this book in our juvenile nonfiction section under the call number j394.12 CHEVAT.

Series of Unfortunate Events

There’s good news for everyone who enjoyed the Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket! The netflix series has been renewed for seasons two and three. Are you ready for more of the sad tale of the Baudelaire children? If not you still have time to catch up on the books and the show because season two does not yet have a release date. You can find the books at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SNICKET.

Star Wars Day!

May the 4th Be With You! In celebration of Star Wars Day, here is a round up of some of our favorite Star Wars books:

Small Scenes from a Big Galaxy by Vesa Lehtimaki (Juvenile Nonfiction  j688.725 LEHTIMAKI): A really neat book where they use Lego Star Wars pieces to re-create famous scenes from the Star Wars movies!

Star Wars: Return of the Jedi: Beware the Power of the Dark Side! by Tom Angleberger (Juvenile Fiction J STAR): This original retelling of the Return of the Jedi is an enjoyable read!

Star Wars: Absolutely Everything You Need to Know by Adam Bray (Juvenile Nonfiction j791.437 BRAY): For those who want to know even more trivia and strange but true facts this is the book for you!

What’re your favorite Star Wars books?

Mighty Jack

Mighty Jack by Ben Hatke

Mighty JackJack might be the only kid in the world who’s dreading summer. But he’s got a good reason: summer is when his single mom takes a second job and leaves him at home to watch his autistic kid sister, Maddy. It’s a lot of responsibility, and it’s boring, too, because Maddy doesn’t talk. Ever. But then, one day at the flea market, Maddy does talk–to tell Jack to trade their mom’s car for a box of mysterious seeds. It’s the best mistake Jack has ever made. What starts as a normal little garden out back behind the house quickly grows up into a wild, magical jungle with tiny onion babies running amok, huge, pink pumpkins that bite, and, on one moonlit night that changes everything…a dragon.

This graphic novel is a cool new twist on Jack and the Beanstalk. Lots of adventure and a little bit of magic makes me want to read the next book in the series! This book is recommended for grades 5-7. Look for it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels under J GRAPHIC HATKE. 

 

~am

On This Day: First Modern Olympic Games

Of course, the first ever recorded Olympic Games was in 776 B.C. but the games were banned in 393 A.D. So, April 6th, 1896 was the date that the first modern Olympic Games was held:

The Olympic Games, a long-lost tradition of ancient Greece, are reborn in Athens 1,500 years after being banned by Roman Emperor Theodosius I. At the opening of the Athens Games, King Georgios I of Greece and a crowd of 60,000 spectators welcomed athletes from 13 nations to the international competition.

You can read more about these first modern Olympic Games at http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-modern-olympic-games and you can check out our books on the Olympics!
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