Tag Archives: books into movies

Throwback Thursday: Wait Till Helen Comes

For this Throwback Thursday, I recommend: Wait Till Helen Comes by Mary Downing Hahn.

wait-till-helenTwelve-year-old Molly and her ten-year-old brother, Michael, have never liked their younger stepsister, Heather. Ever since their parents got married, she’s made Molly’s and Michael’s lives miserable. Now their parents have moved them all to the country to live in a house that used to be a church – with a cemetery in the backyard. If that’s not bad enough, Heather starts talking to a ghost named Helen and warning Molly and Michael that Helen is coming to them. Molly feels certain Heather is in some kind of danger, but every time she tries to help, Heather twists things around to get her into trouble. It seems as if things can’t get any worse. But they do – when Helen comes.

This frightening ghost story, complete with secrets from the past and unsettled graves, makes it one of my favorite books to recommend to those who want to savor a frightening read on a spooky October night! You can find this novel in the Juvenile section at J HAHN.

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Mary Poppins Returns

Did you know that Mary Poppins is not just a movie but is also a book series? The sceond Mary Poppins movie, Mary Poppins Returns, will be released in theaters on December 19 so you still have time to check out the books here at the library (Juvenile Fiction – J TRAVERS).

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Matilda

matilda.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Matilda by Roald Dahl.

Matilda, a brilliant, sensitive little girl, uses her talents and ingenuity to seek revenge on her crooked father, lazy mother, and the terrifying Miss Trunchbull, her wicked headmistress, and save her beloved teacher, Miss Honey.

Published in 1988, Matilda is another example of Roald Dahl’s work and another classic novel that has been released as a movie. The humor and the triumph of good over evil with the girl as the hero make this a book that has become a classic.

You can find Matilda in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Island of the Blue Dolphins

Island of the blue dolphins.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell.

Left alone on a beautiful but isolated island, a young Indian girl spends eighteen years, not only merely surviving through her enormous courage and self-reliance, but also finding a measure of happiness in her solitary life.

Originally published in 1960, this classic novel was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1961. This book has also been a part of the Battle of the Books program at the Bartlett Public Library. This story of survival and resiliency is great for late elementary school readers who enjoyed books such as Hatchet by Gary Paulsen or Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ODELL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Borrowers

The borrowers.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

Miniature people who live in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

What could be more fascinating than the idea that there could be tiny people hiding in your own house- borrowing things and living just under your nose? This classic children’s novel was the inspiration for the Disney and Studio Ghibli movie The Secret World of Arrietty. First published in 1952 in the United Kingdom and 1953 in the United States- this book also won the British Carnegie Medal in 1952 which is awarded to the year’s most outstanding children’s literature by a British author. This is great for reader’s who enjoyed books like The Doll People by Ann M Martin.

You can find this classic in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NORTON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Wind in the Willows

the wind in the willows.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame.

The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside – Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger. When Mr. Toad gets a new motor car, he gets them all in trouble.

First published in 1908 – this classic children’s novel is for readers who like animal stories full of antics. This classic has been adapted in various stage plays, musicals, and, of course, movies! You can find it at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GRAHAME.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Little Prince

The Little Prince.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

This is a charming illustrated book whose slim size can be rather deceiving as the tale is an allegory. First published in 1943, this book has often been assigned as a part of school reading and is now a part of the Great American Read 2018 run by PBS. This is recommended for anyone who enjoyed Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland or Barrie’s Peter Pan.

You can find this book in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA SAINT-EXUPERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw