Tag Archives: books into movies

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw

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Book Review: The Giver

 

In the novel “The Giver”, Lois Lowry presents a unique dystopian community without any differences among the people. In this community, at the age of twelve, you are assigned a job based on your knowledge on a certain subject. This is the only job you will have throughout your life. This novel follows a 12-year-old boy named Jonas who hasn’t been assigned but selected to be the next Receiver of Memory. As Jonas receives his training from the present Receiver of Memory, he experiences many feelings that existed many generations ago, but not today.

All these feeling and memories were held inside everyone, until the community decided to change into Sameness. Sameness is total control over everything in order to make it the same. As Jonas and the Giver (present Receiver of Memory) continue with their training, Jonas wanted to make a difference. He wanted to change the community. He wanted everyone to feel want he felt. The Giver told him that if he crosses the boundary of memory, all the memories within him will spread throughout the community and the people.


Originally published in 1993, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry is a John Newbery Medal award winning book that consists of thrilling, exciting, and creative thoughts. I would recommend this book to readers that are interested in a new and innovative world where everyone is the same with no differences. This book makes you want to read more and more until there are no more pages.


A riveting utopian novel that’s expertly crafted.”  –  commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

Throwback Thursday: The Little White Horse

The Little White HorseFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Goudge.

In 1842, thirteen-year-old orphan Maria Merryweather arrives at her ancestral home in an enchanted village in England’s West Country, where she discovers it is her destiny to right the wrongs of her ancestors and end an ancient feud.

This classic was originally published in 1946 and won the Carnegie Medal. Although the title sounds cute is meant for the older elementary school and middle school audience. The setting is England in 1842, and the detailed descriptions of everything from buildings to clothing to food really transports the reader to this time and place! This does lead to some very dated vocabulary which could be confusing for a young reader but could also be a great time to encourage readers to use a dictionary when they do not understand a word. I recommend this book to fantasy and animal lovers who are looking for a challenge.

~aw

Book vs Movie: The Incredible Journey

 

Did you know that the Disney movie “Homeward Bound” is based on the book “The Incredible Journey” by Sheila Every Burnford?  It is the story about two dogs and a cat that start on a journey to return to their family.  The three house pets experience hunger, wild forest animals and the natural elements while on their way home.  Read the book, watch the movie and then let us know which one you liked better.

~ps

Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: A Little Princess

A Little Princess.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday we’re highlighting: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin’s London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

This book was first published in 1905 (and was an expanded version of a short story that had been published in 1888), and has been adapted into many different movies – one of the most well known stars Shirley Temple.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: A Wrinkle in Time

Since the movie is being released on March 9th, I thought that it would only be fair to recommend A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle for this Throwback Thursday!

Meg and Charles Wallace set out with their friend Calvin in a search for their father. His top secret job as a physicist for the government has taken him away and the children search through time and space to find him.

First published in 1962, this book is an excellent example of classic science fiction. A Wrinkle in Time was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1963, and has gone on to inspire multiple movies. You can check out the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LENGLE, and you can check out the trailer for the new movie below.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

charlie and the chocolate factory.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka’s mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way.

Most people will have seen at least one of the movies based on this classic novel but did you know that this book was first published in 1964, and that it has a sequel called Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator? Much like the movies this book is great for anyone who enjoys humorous stories and has an active imagination.

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

20,000 leaguesFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne.

Professor Aronnax and his two companions, trapped aboard a fantastic submarine as prisoners of the deranged Captain Nemo, come face to face with exotic ocean creatures and strange sights hidden from the world above.

This classic book by Jules Verne was published in 1869, and like many of our Throwback Thursday classics it has been adapted into a movie. This book can get a little wordy but for anyone who enjoys serious science-fiction this classic is not to be missed!

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J VERNE.

~aw