Tag Archives: book review

Book Review: Motor Girls

motor girlsToday I recommend: Motor Girls: How Women Took the Wheel and Drove Boldly into the Twentieth Century by Sue Macy.

Presents the first generation of female motorists who drove cars for fun, profit, and to make a statement about the evolving role of women.

This books offers a deeper look at the first women to drive automobiles, including in races and throughout the World War. It also offers some fun facts along the way such as the most ridiculous rules of the road (certain mayors in Illinois authorized the police to put wire or throw logs in front of speeding cars). With lots of pictures and sidebars filled with quick facts this nonfiction book is a great read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j629.283 MACY.

~aw

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Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Looking for something fun to read?  Have you heard of Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson?

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Phoebe uses her one wish to make the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, her best friend.  Marigold Heavenly Nostrils is a majestic unicorn who isn’t used to the problems Phoebe faces, like kids thinking she’s weird, piano lessons, and what it means to be a friend.  Somehow a funny awkward girl and a self-absorbed mythical creature are able to find common ground and become friends!  If you find yourself laughing as much as I did, you will be happy to know that this is just the first in the Heavenly Nostrils series!

You can find it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels collection under J GRAPHIC SIMPSON.

Book Review: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus

cactusToday I recommend: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling.

Aven Green was born without arms. She has always been encouraged and supported by her parents that she can achieve anything she tries. However, when her family moves from Kansas she leaves her familiar life and friends and now she is in Arizona living at a dying western theme park where her parents become the new managers.

You can imagine it is challenging to meet friends in her new school. And there are many secrets she wants to solve. The tale of Stagecoach Pass is just as compelling as the story of Aven. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BOWLING.

~ra

Book Review: The Empty Grave

empty graveToday I recommend: The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud.

With the help of some unexpected, and rather ghostly, allies, Lockwood & Co. must battle their greatest enemy yet, as they move ever closer to the moment when the earth-shattering secret of ‘the problem’ will finally be revealed.

This is the fifth and final book in the Lockwood & Company series, and it was just as gripping as the rest of the books! This is a great book for kids who like some chills and ghosts in their books. Fast paced and full of action this was a quick page turner. I don’t want to give away any of the plot but this book has a satisfying ending that wraps up the series well.

If you’re looking for a fast paced adventure or if you enjoyed Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy you should give this series a shot! You can find this as well as the other books in the series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J STROUD.

~aw

Book Review: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis.

In 1950, “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by C. S. Lewis was published and a children’s classic was born.  In this fantasy, four siblings are evacuated from London during WWII and sent to the country to live with a professor.  While exploring his house, they discover a magical wardrobe which is a portal to the land of Narnia.  Read this exciting adventure story and then watch the movie!

You can find the book and the rest of the Chronicles of Narnia series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LEWIS and the movie in the Juvenile DVDs at jDVD FIC CHR.

~ps

Book Review: The Explorer

the explorerToday I recommend: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell.

Left stranded in the Amazon jungle when their plane crashes on their way back to England from Manaus, Brazil, four children struggle to survive for days until one of them finds a map that leads them to a ruined city and a secret hidden among the vines.

This is a good book for kids craving a little adventure. It is fast-paced and I was hooked from the first few pages when the pilot passes away right at the controls of the plane. There are loads of descriptions of the kids getting creative to find food in the jungle (grub pancakes anyone?) and an adorable animal sidekick in the form of a sloth that they adopt. This is historical fiction but the closest read-alike would be Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RUNDELL.

~aw

Book Review: Thornhill

thornill.jpgToday I recommend: Thornhill by Pam Smy.

Parallel plot-lines set in different times, one told in text and one in art, inform each other as a young girl unravels the mystery of a ghost next door.

If you like to read horror stories, this one’s for you! Set in different time periods, two girls meet in an abandoned building. One girl’s story is told through diary entries and the other girl’s story through black and white drawings. This is a quick read with a message that will stay with you.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SMY.

~ra

Book Review: Scary Stories

scary stories.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend the Scary Stories (series) by Alvin Schwartz.

Tapped from the oral traditions of American folklore, these ghost stories and tales of weird happenings, witches, and graveyards have startling, funny, or surprising endings.

Since it is Banned Books Week we’re highlighting this series of spooky stories which were the most frequently challenged book series from 1990-1999 according to the American Library Association. You can check out the rest of the Top 100 Frequently Challenged Books from 1990-1999 at the following link: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/100-most-frequently-challenged-books-1990%E2%80%931999

If you like a good scare you can check out the books in the Scary Stories series by Alvin Schwartz in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j398.25 SCHWARTZ.

~aw

Book Review: The Losers Club

losers clubToday we recommend: The Losers Club by Andrew Clements.

Alec, a sixth-grade bookworm always in trouble for reading instead of listening and participating in class, starts a book club, solely to have a place to read, and discovers that real life, although messy, can be as exciting as the stories in his favorite books.

From the author of Frindle and Extra Credit comes this school story that features Alec, an avid reader who often gets in trouble while reading his favorite books while NOT paying attention to his teachers or assignments. When his working parents need him attend the After School program, he plans a way to read uninterrupted by forming an unusual book club. And to avoid unwanted members from joining, he names the club “The Losers Club” to keep other students away.  Unfortunately, trouble follows him wherever he goes.  Readers will discover many favorite titles introduced in this novel.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CLEMENTS.

~ra

 

Book Review: Forever, or a Long, Long Time

forever or a longToday I recommend: Forever, or a Long, Long Time by Caela Carter.

Having shared so many foster homes that they are unable to trust that the family that has adopted them will last, Flora and her brother, Julian, are assisted by their new mother on a journey to resolve their past so that they can build a future.

This is a serious and thought provoking read that deals with topics such as foster care, families, and trauma as siblings Flora and Julian deal with the question of how they could be born if they don’t have a biological mother and how long their adoptive mother will be around (she says forever).

You can find Forever, or a Long, Long Time in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CARTER.

~aw