Tag Archives: book review

Throwback Thursday: Hatchet

HatchetFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness, learning to survive initially with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents’ divorce.

First published in 1987, this book has made countless school reading lists and was an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book in 1988. You can’t look away from this book as Brian struggles to survive on his own. This is a gripping adventure story, and is most suitable for those older children who have moved past the I Survived series by Tarshis.

You can find Hatchet in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PAULSEN.

~aw

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Book Review: The Time Museum

The Time MuseumToday I recommend: The Time Museum by Matthew Loux.

Science-loving Delia Bean is expecting to have a pretty boring summer vacation looking after her little brother. But when her Uncle Lyndon offers her an internship in his Earth Time Museum, everything begins to look a lot better!

I’ll admit that I love just about anything that has to do with time travel and to have that combined with a museum that covers the entire history of Earth really caught my attention. This is a fast paced graphic novel – the action picks up quickly as Delia begins to time-travel with other prospective interns as they compete to be chosen for the coveted internship at the Earth Time Museum. The art work is really loose and fluid which just adds to the fast pace of the graphic novel. I also found myself quickly growing attached to the large cast of teens who were competing and cheering them on as they finally began to work together. I recommend this to anyone who likes graphic novels and science fiction – this was a fun read.

You can find The Time Museum in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC LOUX.

~aw

Pablo & Birdy

Today we’d like to recommend Pablo & Birdy by Alison McGheeImage result for pablo and birdy

In this new fiction book featuring magical realism, we read about Pablo, a boy with a mysterious early start in life – floating to shore on the tropical island of Isla as a baby tied inside an inflatable swimming pool with a colorful bird, later named Birdy, by his side. Where did Pablo and Birdy come from and does Birdy know about Pablo’s origin? Throughout the story, Pablo wonders who were his mother and father and what happened to them. He questions Emmanuel, his supportive adoptive father, his closest friends and even Birdy who doesn’t speak like the other birds roaming the island. Now approaching is 10th birthday, Pablo must make a difficult decision when he discovers that the legend of the Seafaring Parrot might be true.

You can find this in our Juvenile Fiction collection under the call number J MCGHEE.

Book Review: Motor Girls

motor girlsToday I recommend: Motor Girls: How Women Took the Wheel and Drove Boldly into the Twentieth Century by Sue Macy.

Presents the first generation of female motorists who drove cars for fun, profit, and to make a statement about the evolving role of women.

This books offers a deeper look at the first women to drive automobiles, including in races and throughout the World War. It also offers some fun facts along the way such as the most ridiculous rules of the road (certain mayors in Illinois authorized the police to put wire or throw logs in front of speeding cars). With lots of pictures and sidebars filled with quick facts this nonfiction book is a great read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j629.283 MACY.

~aw

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Looking for something fun to read?  Have you heard of Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson?

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Phoebe uses her one wish to make the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, her best friend.  Marigold Heavenly Nostrils is a majestic unicorn who isn’t used to the problems Phoebe faces, like kids thinking she’s weird, piano lessons, and what it means to be a friend.  Somehow a funny awkward girl and a self-absorbed mythical creature are able to find common ground and become friends!  If you find yourself laughing as much as I did, you will be happy to know that this is just the first in the Heavenly Nostrils series!

You can find it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels collection under J GRAPHIC SIMPSON.

Book Review: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus

cactusToday I recommend: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling.

Aven Green was born without arms. She has always been encouraged and supported by her parents that she can achieve anything she tries. However, when her family moves from Kansas she leaves her familiar life and friends and now she is in Arizona living at a dying western theme park where her parents become the new managers.

You can imagine it is challenging to meet friends in her new school. And there are many secrets she wants to solve. The tale of Stagecoach Pass is just as compelling as the story of Aven. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BOWLING.

~ra

Book Review: The Empty Grave

empty graveToday I recommend: The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud.

With the help of some unexpected, and rather ghostly, allies, Lockwood & Co. must battle their greatest enemy yet, as they move ever closer to the moment when the earth-shattering secret of ‘the problem’ will finally be revealed.

This is the fifth and final book in the Lockwood & Company series, and it was just as gripping as the rest of the books! This is a great book for kids who like some chills and ghosts in their books. Fast paced and full of action this was a quick page turner. I don’t want to give away any of the plot but this book has a satisfying ending that wraps up the series well.

If you’re looking for a fast paced adventure or if you enjoyed Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy you should give this series a shot! You can find this as well as the other books in the series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J STROUD.

~aw

Book Review: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis.

In 1950, “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by C. S. Lewis was published and a children’s classic was born.  In this fantasy, four siblings are evacuated from London during WWII and sent to the country to live with a professor.  While exploring his house, they discover a magical wardrobe which is a portal to the land of Narnia.  Read this exciting adventure story and then watch the movie!

You can find the book and the rest of the Chronicles of Narnia series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LEWIS and the movie in the Juvenile DVDs at jDVD FIC CHR.

~ps

Book Review: The Explorer

the explorerToday I recommend: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell.

Left stranded in the Amazon jungle when their plane crashes on their way back to England from Manaus, Brazil, four children struggle to survive for days until one of them finds a map that leads them to a ruined city and a secret hidden among the vines.

This is a good book for kids craving a little adventure. It is fast-paced and I was hooked from the first few pages when the pilot passes away right at the controls of the plane. There are loads of descriptions of the kids getting creative to find food in the jungle (grub pancakes anyone?) and an adorable animal sidekick in the form of a sloth that they adopt. This is historical fiction but the closest read-alike would be Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RUNDELL.

~aw

Book Review: Thornhill

thornill.jpgToday I recommend: Thornhill by Pam Smy.

Parallel plot-lines set in different times, one told in text and one in art, inform each other as a young girl unravels the mystery of a ghost next door.

If you like to read horror stories, this one’s for you! Set in different time periods, two girls meet in an abandoned building. One girl’s story is told through diary entries and the other girl’s story through black and white drawings. This is a quick read with a message that will stay with you.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SMY.

~ra