Tag Archives: Attention-grabbing

Book Review: Illegal

illegal by eoin colferToday I recommend: Illegal by Eoin Colfer.

Ebo is alone. His brother, Kwame, has disappeared, and Ebo knows it can only be to attempt the hazardous journey to Europe, and a better life, the same journey their sister set out on months ago. But Ebo refuses to be left behind in Ghana. He sets out after Kwame and joins him on the quest to reach Europe. Ebo’s epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his family.

As the author notes although Illegal is a work of fiction all of the different portions of it are true, and events similar to what happen to Ebo happen to children, teens, and adults each day. This graphic novel is a compassionate look at the plight of refugees and immigrants. Readers will gain empathy for Ebo as the novel does not shy away from the terrible events that happen to him but his positive outlook lessens the overwhelming nature of the tragedies. The graphic novel would be an excellent teaching tool- to combine with history lessons or current events. Readers who enjoy graphic novel memoirs or graphic novel nonfiction such as Spinning by Walden or March by Lewis should check out this book.

You can find Illegal by Eoin Colfer in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC COLFER.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: Fair Weather

Fair Weather.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday Ruth Anne recommends: Fair Weather by Richard Peck.

In 1893, thirteen-year-old Rosie and members of her family travel from their Illinois farm to Chicago to visit Aunt Euterpe and attend the World’s Columbian Exposition which, along with an encounter with Buffalo Bill and Lillian Russell, turns out to be a life-changing experience for everyone.

Richard Peck passed away on May 23, 2018- but his books are well regarded and on their way to becoming classics. This is perfect for readers who enjoy historical fiction especially readers who live in and around Chicago and Illinois. Full of humor and fast-paced this is also a great inter-generational story that shows relationships between children and grandparents.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PECK.

~ra & aw

Book Review: The Candymakers

The CandymakersToday I recommend The Candymakers by Wendy Mass.

This awesome novel is about four contestants competing at an annual candy making competition. Throughout the whole entire novel, there is perspectives of all of the main characters. There are many twists as the plot unfurls. From each perspective, you understand more and more.

This is one of my favorite novels of all time. I have read it twice, and it is so awesome. Nothing sad or scary happens, and it is very exciting. It makes my mouth water, and the novel is cleverly written. Because of this book, I have read many others of Wendy Mass’ novels including A Mango Shaped Space. I recommend this novel to anyone who likes the Book Scavenger series, candy, or hilarious books. There is a sequel to this novel, which is just as awesome to the first one.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

This book can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MASS.

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Book Review: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament

Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament.jpgToday I recommend: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament by Anne Renaud.

When a fussy patron sends his order of potatoes back twice, chef George Crum decides to have some fun, based on the true story of the potato chip.

This book is an enjoyable mix of both history and a good dose of your classic tall tale. What makes this one specially nice is the inclusion of some back matter that gives information about the real-life Mr. Crum and the photographs of the restaurant which explains how even if eh was not the original inventor of the potato chip that his version was certainly well-known. Hand this to anyone who enjoys humor and anyone who loves this classic snack.

You can find this book in the Easy Fiction section at E RENAUD.

~aw