Tag Archives: adventure

Throwback Thursday: Island of the Blue Dolphins

Island of the blue dolphins.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell.

Left alone on a beautiful but isolated island, a young Indian girl spends eighteen years, not only merely surviving through her enormous courage and self-reliance, but also finding a measure of happiness in her solitary life.

Originally published in 1960, this classic novel was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1961. This book has also been a part of the Battle of the Books program at the Bartlett Public Library. This story of survival and resiliency is great for late elementary school readers who enjoyed books such as Hatchet by Gary Paulsen or Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ODELL.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: Julie of the Wolves

Julie of the wolves.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George.

While running away from home and an unwanted marriage, a thirteen-year-old Eskimo girl becomes lost on the North Slope of Alaska and is befriended by a wolf pack.

This classic novel was originally published in 1972, and was followed by two sequels Julie (in 1994) and Julie’s Wolf Pack (in 1997). The book was awarded the Newbery Medal in 1973. This book is for readers who enjoy adventure and survival stories as Julie (who prefers her Eskimo name Miyax) struggles to learn how to survive on the tundra by learning more about the wolf pack.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GEORGE.

~aw

Book vs Movie: The Incredible Journey

 

Did you know that the Disney movie “Homeward Bound” is based on the book “The Incredible Journey” by Sheila Every Burnford?  It is the story about two dogs and a cat that start on a journey to return to their family.  The three house pets experience hunger, wild forest animals and the natural elements while on their way home.  Read the book, watch the movie and then let us know which one you liked better.

~ps

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: Hatchet

HatchetFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness, learning to survive initially with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents’ divorce.

First published in 1987, this book has made countless school reading lists and was an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book in 1988. You can’t look away from this book as Brian struggles to survive on his own. This is a gripping adventure story, and is most suitable for those older children who have moved past the I Survived series by Tarshis.

You can find Hatchet in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PAULSEN.

~aw

Book Review: Castle in the Stars

castle in the stars.jpgToday I recommend: Castle in the Stars: The Space Race of 1869 by Alex Alice.

In search of the mysterious element known as aether, Claire Dulac flew her hot air balloon toward the edge of our stratosphere―and never returned. One year after his mother’s disappearance, Seraphin and his father are delivered a tantalizing clue: a letter from an unknown sender who claims to have Claire’s lost logbook. The letter summons them to a Bavarian castle, where an ambitious young king dreams of flying the skies in a ship powered by aether. But within the castle walls, danger lurks―there are those who would stop at nothing to conquer the stars.

Science fiction and steampunk fans rejoice! This graphic novel has gorgeous and super detailed illustrations of aetherships and other technological marvels. Seraphin quickly recruits some friends to form the Knights of the Aether to protect King Ludwig while also searching for a way to make it to the stars! There is lots of banter, and a quick pace to the adventures but it does end on quite a cliff-hanger. This is perfect for anyone who likes science fiction, Jules Verne, or adventure stories who don’t mind the quirky steampunk setting!

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC ALEX.

~aw

Book Review: The Time Museum

The Time MuseumToday I recommend: The Time Museum by Matthew Loux.

Science-loving Delia Bean is expecting to have a pretty boring summer vacation looking after her little brother. But when her Uncle Lyndon offers her an internship in his Earth Time Museum, everything begins to look a lot better!

I’ll admit that I love just about anything that has to do with time travel and to have that combined with a museum that covers the entire history of Earth really caught my attention. This is a fast paced graphic novel – the action picks up quickly as Delia begins to time-travel with other prospective interns as they compete to be chosen for the coveted internship at the Earth Time Museum. The art work is really loose and fluid which just adds to the fast pace of the graphic novel. I also found myself quickly growing attached to the large cast of teens who were competing and cheering them on as they finally began to work together. I recommend this to anyone who likes graphic novels and science fiction – this was a fun read.

You can find The Time Museum in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC LOUX.

~aw

Book Review: The Empty Grave

empty graveToday I recommend: The Empty Grave by Jonathan Stroud.

With the help of some unexpected, and rather ghostly, allies, Lockwood & Co. must battle their greatest enemy yet, as they move ever closer to the moment when the earth-shattering secret of ‘the problem’ will finally be revealed.

This is the fifth and final book in the Lockwood & Company series, and it was just as gripping as the rest of the books! This is a great book for kids who like some chills and ghosts in their books. Fast paced and full of action this was a quick page turner. I don’t want to give away any of the plot but this book has a satisfying ending that wraps up the series well.

If you’re looking for a fast paced adventure or if you enjoyed Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy you should give this series a shot! You can find this as well as the other books in the series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J STROUD.

~aw

Book Review: The Explorer

the explorerToday I recommend: The Explorer by Katherine Rundell.

Left stranded in the Amazon jungle when their plane crashes on their way back to England from Manaus, Brazil, four children struggle to survive for days until one of them finds a map that leads them to a ruined city and a secret hidden among the vines.

This is a good book for kids craving a little adventure. It is fast-paced and I was hooked from the first few pages when the pilot passes away right at the controls of the plane. There are loads of descriptions of the kids getting creative to find food in the jungle (grub pancakes anyone?) and an adorable animal sidekick in the form of a sloth that they adopt. This is historical fiction but the closest read-alike would be Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RUNDELL.

~aw

Back to School – with Spies!

In honor of the start of the school year, we’re highlighting some of the characters in our book collection who are studying to be spies!

Mrs. Smith’s Spy School for Girls by Beth McMullen (Juvenile Fiction – J MCMULLEN): Twelve-year-old Abigail is shocked to discover her elite boarding school is really a cover for a huge spy ring, and must undergo Spy Training 101 in order to save her mother, who happens to be the spy ring’s top agent.

Spy School by Stuart Gibbs, Book 1 of the Spy School Series (Juvenile Fiction – J GIBBS): Twelve-year-old Ben Ripley leaves his public middle school to attend the CIA’s highly secretive Espionage Academy, which everyone is told is an elite science school.

Clayton Stone, at your service by Ena Jones (Juvenile Fiction – J JONES): Twelve-year-old Clayton Stone gets a taste of life as a special agent when he goes undercover as a decoy in a high-stakes kidnapping operation.

Bridget Wilder, Spy in Training by Jonathan Bernstein (Juvenile Fiction – J BERNSTEIN): An adopted middle child receives an unexpected package on an otherwise unremarkable birthday inviting her to join a super-secret division of the CIA.