Book Review: Brave

brave.jpgToday I recommend: Brave by Svetlana Chmakova.

In his daydreams, Jensen is the biggest hero that ever was, saving the world and his friends on a daily basis. But his middle school reality is VERY different – math is hard, getting along with friends is hard…Even finding a partner for the class project is a big problem when you always get picked last. And the pressure’s on even more once the school newspaper’s dynamic duo, Jenny and Akilah, draw Jensen into the whirlwind of school news, social experiment projects, and behind-the-scenes club drama. Jensen’s always played the middle school game one level at a time, but suddenly, someone’s cranked up the difficulty setting. Will those daring daydreams of his finally work in his favor, or will he have to find real solutions to his real life problems?

Set in the same school as Chmakova’s Awkward this graphic novel focuses on Jensen whose struggles to get through difficult classes, as well as feelings of being left out and being bullied, are so easy to relate to. This story tackles some tough subjects such as bullying, dress codes, and failing classes with humor that makes the story fly by without treating them too lightly.  This is a great option for readers who enjoyed Awkward but is also great as a standalone graphic novel.  Read-alikes for this series are: Raina Telgemeier’s Sisters and Shannon Hale’s Real Friends.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC CHMAKOVA.

~aw

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ALA’s Rebel Reader Twitter Tournament

The American Library Association is inviting people to speak out again censorship during Banned Books Week by tweeting pictures of themselves with banned books for a chance to win prizes!

Tweet any of the following action items using the hashtag #RebelReader during Banned Books Week (September 24-30) for a chance to win an array of literary prizes.Twitter Rebel Reader

You can find more information about the contest as well as the official rules at: http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/bannedbooksweek/rebelreader

Book Review: The Phantom Tollbooth

phantom tollbooth.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster.

A bored young boy, Milo, drives his small electric car through a toy tollbooth and finds himself in the Land Beyond. A journey through a land where Milo learns the importance of words and numbers provides a cure for his boredom.

First published in 1961, The Phantom Tollbooth has been adapted into a movie as well as published as an annotated version. Lovely illustrations just add to the appeal of this witty book about a boy searching for a cure for his boredom.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J JUSTER, and the movie in the Juvenile DVD section at jDVD FIC TOL.

~aw

Book Review: The Losers Club

losers clubToday we recommend: The Losers Club by Andrew Clements.

Alec, a sixth-grade bookworm always in trouble for reading instead of listening and participating in class, starts a book club, solely to have a place to read, and discovers that real life, although messy, can be as exciting as the stories in his favorite books.

From the author of Frindle and Extra Credit comes this school story that features Alec, an avid reader who often gets in trouble while reading his favorite books while NOT paying attention to his teachers or assignments. When his working parents need him attend the After School program, he plans a way to read uninterrupted by forming an unusual book club. And to avoid unwanted members from joining, he names the club “The Losers Club” to keep other students away.  Unfortunately, trouble follows him wherever he goes.  Readers will discover many favorite titles introduced in this novel.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J CLEMENTS.

~ra

 

Throwback Thursday: Pippi Longstocking

If you have seen the movie “Pippi Longstocking,” you might like to read the story by Astrid Lindgren. The book was first published 72 years ago in 1945! The series about Pippi Longstocking has been adapted into numerous books, DVDs, and graphic novels. Pippi lives by herself on the edge of a Swedish village with a monkey and a horse.  For more adventures of Pippi read “Pippi Goes to School.”

You can find the books in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LINDGREN.

~ps

 

9/11

On this somber day, we have a couple of suggestions for books about the events of, and in remembrance of 9/11:

Nonfiction:

Saved by the Boats: the Heroic Sea Evacuation of September 11 by Julie Gassman (Juvenile Nonfiction j974.71 GASSMAN): Presents the heroic sea evacuation of September 11, 2001 with narrative text and vivid illustrations.

Cause and Effect: The September 11 Attacks by Robert Green (Juvenile Nonfiction j973.931 GREEN): Examines the September 11 terrorist attacks, discussing the events leading up to the attack, the impact on American society, and its lasting effect around America and the globe.

14 Cows for America by Carmen Agra Deedy (Juvenile Nonfiction j327.676 DEEDY): Maasai tribal members, after hearing the story of the September 11th attacks from a young Massai, who was in New York on that day, decide to present the American people with fourteen sacred cows as a healing gift.

Historical Fiction:

Nine, Ten: A September 11 story by Nora Raleigh Baskin (Juvenile Fiction J BASKIN): Relates how the lives of four children living in different parts of the country intersect and are affected by the events of September 11, 2001.

Somewhere Among by Annie Donwerth-Chikamatsu (Juvenile Fiction J DONWERTH): Eleven-year-old Emma’s life in Tokyo changes for the worse when she and her American mother, who is pregnant, must move in with her Japanese grandmother the summer before 9/11 changes the world.

I Survived the Attacks of September 11, 2001 by Lauren Tarshis (Juvenile Fiction J TARSHIS): When Lucas decides to skip school because he wants to discuss football with a firefighter friend of his father, he finds himself caught up in the terrorist attacks on New York City.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: Wizard of Oz

It’s time for another Throwback Thursday!

Did you know that the 1939 movie, The Wizard of Oz, was a book published in 1900 titled, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written by Frank L. Baum?  Read this American classic that follows Dorothy Gale through the Land of OZ and find out if the movie matches the book.  One difference is that Dorothy’s slippers are silver not ruby red!  When you finish the book, read The Road to Oz which tells the life story of the author! You can check out this classic and the other books in the Oz series in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BAUM.

Book vs. Movie!

~ps