Category Archives: historical fiction

Tru & Nelle: A Christmas Tale by Greg Neri

With Christmas coming in less than two weeks, some of you might enjoy reading a mystery and detective story which takes place this time of year: Tru & Nelle: A Christmas Tale by Greg Neri. When they were younger, Tru and Nelle were best friends, sharing adventures and solving mysteries in Monroeville, Alabama. But then Tru moved to New York City to live with his mother and their friendship slowly faded away. Life in the big city wasn’t as fun as Tru had hoped it would be. In fact, he ran away, and now he’s back and hoping he and Nelle can be friends again.Unfortunately, thing’s aren’t so great in Munroeville, either. Maybe he should have run away to somewhere else.
But Christmas is just around the corner, and there’s nothing like the holidays to bring everyone back together. Based on true events, Tru & Nelle: A Christmas Tale is the continuing story of one of the greatest literary friendships of the 20th century. Tru-and-Nelle-A-Christmas-Tale-G_-Neri.jpg

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NERI.

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The Safest Lie by Angela Cerrito

For those who enjoy traveling back in time, I recommend: The Safest Lie by Angela Cerrito. Anna Bauman, a Polish Jew lives in the Warsaw ghetto.  She is smuggled out of the ghetto and into a Catholic orphanage where she is trained to be a Christian so that she can hide in plain sight.  Eventually she is adopted by a Polish family who have secrets of their own.  Told from Anna’s perspective, this is a harrowing tale of secrets and survival.  Anna must become a whole new person, Anna Korwolska a Catholic girl, in order to fool the Germans.  At the same time, Anna desperately tries to hold onto her Jewish past, a past that keeps her connected to the loving parents, grandparents, and family members she so desperately refuses to forget.SAFEST LIE DESKTOP

You can find this moving book in the Juvenile Fiction section at:

J CERRITO

 

Book Review: Projekt 1065

Today I recommend: Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz.

World War II is raging and Michael O’Shaunessey, originally from Ireland, now lives with his parents in Nazi Germany. Everyone knows that Ireland is “neutral,” but Michael and his family have a secret. He and his parents are spies for the Allies. Michael joins the Hitler Youth and becomes everything he despises to play the part so he can assist his parents by gaining insider knowledge. Soon Michael learns about “Projekt 1065,” a secret Nazi fighter jet, and things get even more complicated for him and his parents. Now he must risk his life and the lives of others to get the secret plans into the hands of the British Secret Service. Short and to the point chapters add to this book’s appeal. This is a fast-paced spy thriller and accurate historical account of the Hitler Youth – Projektmaking this a great book for World War II, as well as realistic fiction fans.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GRATZ

Book Review: Twerp

Today I recommend: Twerp by Mark Goldblatt.

“It’s not like I meant for Danley to get hurt…” Julian Twerski isn’t a bully. He’s just made a big mistake. So when he returns to school after a week long suspension, his English teacher offers him a deal – if he keeps a journal and writes about the terrible incident that got him and his friends suspended, he can get out of writing a report on Shakespeare. Julian jumps at the chance. And so begins his account of life in sixth grade – blowing up homemade fireworks, writing a love letter for his best friend (with disastrous results) and worrying whether he’s still the fastest kid in school. Lurking in the background, though, is the one story he can’t bring himself to tell, the one story his teacher most wants to hear. Inspired by Mark Goldblatt’s own childhood growing up in 1960’s Queens, Twerp shines with humor and heart. This remarkably powerful story will have readers laughing and crying right along with these flawed but unforgettable characters.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GOLDBLATTtwerp

Throwback Thursday: Number the Stars

Today I recommend: Number the Stars

This is a recommendation from the Teen Advisory Boardnumber the stars

Annemarie Johansen has, at the age of ten, been under Nazi occupation for three years in her native land of Denmark. When the Nazis begin to round up Jewish people, she and her family take in Annemarie’s friend, Ellen Rosen, and pretend Ellen is their daughter. But the family knows Ellen and her family will never be safe in Denmark so they must find a way to smuggle them out of the country and into neighboring Sweden. This is a wonderful story of courage in the face of terrible circumstances.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LOWRY.