Category Archives: Books

The Bicycle Spy by Yona Zeldis McDonough

 

  • If you love bike riding and bicycle racing this book is for you.  Twelve-year-old Marcel loves riding his bike, and dreams of competing in the Tour de France, but it is 1942 and the Nazis have occupied his homeland.  It is his job to deliver bread from his parents’ bakery around Aucoin, France.  One day while making deliveries, he discovers that it is more than just pastries and bread he is delivering.  Suddenly finding himself with a heavy and dangerous secret, one that could send many people to prison including his new friend Delphine, Marcel must skillfully maneuver between the world of ordinary citizens and the world of the French resistance.

 

Book Review: The Girl Who Drank the Moon

This week I finished reading The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill.girl-who-drank-moon

An epic fantasy about a young girl raised by a witch, a swamp monster, and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, who must unlock the powerful magic buried deep inside her. Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest to keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle and rescues the babies. One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. Xan decides she must raise this enmagicked girl, whom she calls Luna, as her own. Meanwhile, a young man from the Protectorate is determined to free his people by killing the witch. Soon, it is up to Luna to protect those who have protected her–even if it means the end of the loving, safe world she’s always known.

The Girl Who Drank the Moon was 2016’s Newbery Award Winner, and is a good book for anyone who likes very detailed fantasy novels. This book has a slower pace but the question of who exactly is spreading the rumors about the evil witch will keep you reading to the end of the novel. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J Barnhill.

Book Review: The Crystal Ribbon

This week I read The Crystal Ribbon jacket
by Celeste Lim.

Li Jing is an 11 year-old girl with a special connection to the village guardian, the Great Golden Huli Jing- a five-tailed fox.  The family farm isn’t doing well, so they sell her as a bride to the 3 year-old son of the Guo family in another city.  Sadly, her new life is not what her family thought it would be. As her situation worsens, she realizes that the only thing to do is escape.  

This magical story had me hooked right away and I was desperate to know what would happen to dear Li Jing!  It also had me wondering: could I be that brave?  Would I be able to leave my family for a new life I knew would be awful, to save them?  Look for this book in our New Juvenile Fiction collection under the call number J LIM.

 

 

~am

Book Review: Ungifted

This week we recommend: Ungifted by Gordon Korman.

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Here is an offbeat, humorous tale about Donovan, a student who finds himself in the most unexpected place.  After accidentally destroying the school gym, he is scared stiff to face the punishment. However, due to a mix-up in the school administration office, his name is placed on the list for the local school for gifted students.

Read Ungifted to discover how Donovan “might” just surprise everyone with his special talents. You can find Ungifted in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KORMAN or as a book on CD in our Audiobook section at jCD FIC KORMAN.

Book Review: The Screaming Staircase

This week I read: The Screaming Staircase by Jonathan Stroud, which is the first book in the series Lockwood & Co.screaming-staircase

When London is overrun by malevolent spirits, a talented group of young psychic detectives compete against other ghostbusting agencies in the debut of a new series that finds three intrepid colleagues investigating one of England’s most haunted houses.

I enjoyed this book so much that I have already borrowed the second book in the series, The Whispering Skull. The ghost hunting adventure was fast paced and I was hooked from the beginning. It was everything you want from a thriller with some spooky ghosts and a great deal of suspense that keeps you turning the pages right through to the end. If you’re looking for a fast paced adventure or if you enjoyed Jonathan Stroud’s Bartimaeus trilogy you should give this series a shot! You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J STROUD.

 

 

February 26th: Tell a Fairy Tale Day

Tell a Fairy Tale Day is an unofficial holiday celebrated on February 26th that encourages people to listen to, read, and tell their favorite fairy tales from around the world. We love the classics but it is also fun to check out some of the interesting and quirky re-telling of fairy tales such as:

Grounded by Megan Morrison (Juvenile Fiction, J MORRISON)  Rapunzel believes she is the luckiest person in Tyme, because Witch tells her so, but when Jack climbs into her tower to steal an enchanted rose, he hints that Witch is not telling the whole truth and Rapunzel, driven by her anger and fear, descends to the ground for the first time.

The Wishing Spell by Chris Colfer (Juvenile Fiction, J COLFER) Through the mysterious powers of a cherished book of stories, twins Alex and Conner leave their world behind and find themselves in a foreign land full of wonder and magic where they come face-to-face with the fairy tale characters they grew up reading about.

Do you have a favorite fairy tale?

Book Review: Webster: Tale of an Outlaw

This week we suggest: Webster: Tale of an Outlaw by Ellen Emerson White.

websterWhen Webster the dog arrives at Green Meadows Farm he has already been adopted, mistreated, and given away three times and is done with people, but the other animals of the shelter will not let him give up on the possibility of a special family.

For those who love books which have a variety of animals with distinct personalities and who “talk” – as well as books which will leave you smiling at the end – the loveable Webster is a character you will root for as he searches for his “Forever Home.”

This book is highly recommended for animal lovers! You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WHITE.

Time to Vote!

It’s time to vote for the Monarch, Bluestem, and Rebecca Caudill awards. These are awards where the books are chosen by student’s votes. The Monarch Award is Illinois’ Reader’s Choice Award for Kindergarten through Third Grade. The Bluestem Award is Illinois’ Reader’s Choice Award for Grades Third through Fifth. The Rebecca Caudill Award is Illinois’ Reader’s Choice Award for Grades Fourth through Eighth. You can pick up a ballot and vote for your favorites by stopping by the Youth Services desk or by checking the Bluestem and Rebecca Caudill shelves.

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Readers’ Choice Award logos by Illinois School Library Media Association.

Newbery Award

The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

This year’s Newberry Award winner is The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill.  “This compassionate, hopeful novel invites children everywhere to harness their power, and ask important questions about what keeps us apart and what brings us together” said Newbery Medal Committee Chair Thom Barthelmess.

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