Category Archives: Books

Throwback Thursday: The Secret of the Old Clock

secret of the old clockFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Secret of the Old Clock by Carolyn Keene.

Nancy Drew’s keen mind is tested when she searches for a missing will.

This is the first of the Nancy Drew mysteries! Mildred Wirt Benson who was from Iowa wrote this story in 1930 under the pseudnym Carolyn Keene. She would write nearly two dozen stories featuring Nancy Drew. The Nancy Drew mysteries have sold over 200 million copies and have been translated into 25 languages (UI Press release 2007)! This classic mysteries series is great for those who enjoy the Boxcar Children or the Hardy Boy mysteries.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Mystery section at J KEENE.

~aw

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Book Review: Pashmina

pashmina.jpgToday I recommend: Pashmina by Nidhi Chanani.

Pashmina is a graphic novel about a high-school aged girl in America named Priyanka. Her mother immigrated from India to America before Priyanka was born. Priyanka asks her mother many questions about her family and India and why she left, but her mother always tries to change the subject. Priyanka’s “uncle” usually spends time with Priyanka, but now he has  a baby to take with so Priyanka feels lonely. In her mother’s old suitcase, she finds a beautiful Pashmina that takes her to a fantasy India. In the real world, Priyanka wants to visit India, but her mother says no.

This graphic novel was beautifully drawn. I really enjoyed reading it. In the reality parts of the book, it is in black and white. But when she wears the Pashmina, Priyanka is transported to a fantasy India with loads of colors. I thought this was really interesting. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to read a graphic novel full of culture, with a really great story.

-Elizabeth, Teen blogger

You can find Pashmina in the Juvenile Graphic Novel Section at J GRAPHIC CHANANI.

Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

Book Review: Smile

smile.jpgToday I recommend Smile, by Raina Telgemeier.

Smile is a popular graphic novel about a girl’s story of dealing with the craziness of teeth. The main character, Raina, is actually the author of the book, so it is a true story! Her two front teeth fall out, and she gets braces, so now she has to deal with a lot of pain at the dentist. Plus, her friends make fun of her looks and her teeth at school.

I really enjoyed this book. I have read it twice, and I have read many of Raina Telgemeier’s graphic novels. They are all funny, interesting and I love the art styles. I loved Smile so much, I read the book in only one day. I suggest this book to anyone who has lost adult teeth, who wears braces, or just wants to read a very awesome graphic novel.

-Elizabeth, teen blogger

You can find Smile in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC TELGEMEIER.

Book Review: Hello Universe

hello universe.jpgToday I recommend: Hello Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly.

Lives of four misfits are intertwined when a bully’s prank lands shy Virgil at the bottom of a well and Valencia, Kaori, and Gen band together in an epic quest to find and rescue him.

This book was the winner of the 2018 John Newbery Medal, which is awarded by the Association of Library Service to Children to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children during the year. What I loved most about this book was how unique each character was – each one was struggling with feeling different and struggling with their own personal fears but each one also had their own strengths. I really loved all of the little stories that Virgil’s grandmother Lola told him to try and cheer him up, and the illustrations of Virgil’s guinea pig Gulliver at the beginning of chapters added charm to the whole book. There’s a little bit of something for everyone in this book – I especially recommend it to those who like stories of friendship and self-acceptance and for people who like stories where the characters learn to stand up to bullies!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KELLY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: A Little Princess

A Little Princess.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday we’re highlighting: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin’s London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

This book was first published in 1905 (and was an expanded version of a short story that had been published in 1888), and has been adapted into many different movies – one of the most well known stars Shirley Temple.

~aw

Book Review: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

Vanderbeekers of 141st Street.jpgI recommend the book, “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” by Karina Yan Glaser. 

The Vanderbeeker family have been happily living in their Harlem brownstone apartment unit their landlord refuses to renew their lease.  Now, they have five days before Christmas to convince him to let them stay.  Each of the five siblings craft a different strategy to change his mind.

~ps