All posts by bpldteenspace

Why Can’t I Be You

why can't i be you

Teen Book Blogger, Elizabeth N. recommends Why Can’t I Be You by Melissa Walker

Why Can’t I Be You is a realistic fiction novel about a girl named Claire, who is a tween. This summer, she is finally old enough to not go to summer camp, and now she can decide what she wants to do. She has two best friends, Brianna and Ronan, but Brianna’s cousin always takes the spotlight and acts very sophisticated and glamorous. Also, Brianna moved into a new, big house which reminds Claire that her friends have more money than her family. And Ronan has been acting really weird whenever anyone ever talks about, or mentions his father. As she has troubles with her friends, she starts to wish that she could be someone else. I liked this novel. It had lots of meaning and was very realistic in the way that the main character thought. It is a very addicting book. I wanted to know what would happen next in the book. I recommend this book to whoever likes The First Rule of Punk because they are both realistic novels about tween girls dealing with problems with family and a little bit about “fitting in.” Why Can’t I Be You is a great realistic fiction novel that you should read.

 

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WALKER

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Throwback Thursday: Number the Stars

Today I recommend: Number the Stars

(Summary)

This is a recommendation from the Teen Advisory Boardnumber the stars

Annemarie Johansen has, at the age of ten, been under Nazi occupation for three years in her native land of Denmark. When the Nazis begin to round up Jewish people, she and her family take in Annemarie’s friend, Ellen Rosen, and pretend Ellen is their daughter. But the family knows Ellen and her family will never be safe in Denmark so they must find a way to smuggle them out of the country and into neighboring Sweden. This is a wonderful story of courage in the face of terrible circumstances.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J LOWRY.

Book Review: Swing It, Sunny

Today I recommend: Swing It, Sunny  by Jennifer and Matthew Holm.

This page-turning, graphic novel is the sequel to Sunny Side Up. It’s autumn and Sunny is back home and starting middle school. Her brother, Dale, has been sent to a boarding school to help with his drug problems. Sunny misses him terribly, and her fun is often interrupted by thoughts of him, thoughswing it sunnyts that are often completely unrelated to what Sunny is doing. When Dale returns home for the holidays feeling angry and betrayed by his family, it’s Gramps who helps Sunny see the “sunny side of things” again.  If you like this book, you may also like Drama, by Raina Telgemeier or All’s Fair in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

You can find this book in the Juvenile section at J GRAPHIC HOLM.

Throwback Thursday: Wait Till Helen Comes

For this Throwback Thursday, I recommend: Wait Till Helen Comes by Mary Downing Hahn.

wait-till-helenTwelve-year-old Molly and her ten-year-old brother, Michael, have never liked their younger stepsister, Heather. Ever since their parents got married, she’s made Molly’s and Michael’s lives miserable. Now their parents have moved them all to the country to live in a house that used to be a church – with a cemetery in the backyard. If that’s not bad enough, Heather starts talking to a ghost named Helen and warning Molly and Michael that Helen is coming to them. Molly feels certain Heather is in some kind of danger, but every time she tries to help, Heather twists things around to get her into trouble. It seems as if things can’t get any worse. But they do – when Helen comes.

This frightening ghost story, complete with secrets from the past and unsettled graves, makes it one of my favorite books to recommend to those who want to savor a frightening read on a spooky October night! You can find this novel in the Juvenile section at J HAHN.

Book Review: The Girl in the Locked Room

Today I recommend: The Girl in the Locked Room: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn

We are now in the month of October, and I wanted to make sure to feature some scary stories to tingle your spine on chilly autumn nights! In the latest spooky middle grade tale by Mary Downing Hahn, twelve-year-old Jules is tired of being dragged from town to town with her novelist mother and her father, whose work restoring old houses keeps them on the road. Their latest move takes them to Virginia, where Jules encounters a menacing, long-abandoned house, Oak Hill. Readers will know before Jules does that her intuition about the house being haunted is correct! Told in two voices, one being Jules and the other, of a girl who lived in the house a century before, the reader slowly learns of the the girl’s tragic story. With a new local friend, Jules researches what happened at Oak Hill. Can they actually make a difference in the ghost girl’s afterlife? This is a very gentle ghost story: the creepy factor is just right for reading alone at night with the lights out, covers pulled over your head with a flashlight to see the pages.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAHNqq.

Book Review: It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel

Today I recommend: It Ain’t So Awful, Falafel25897857

Zomorod Yousefzadeh is the new kid on the block…for the fourth time. California’s Newport Beach is her family’s latest perch, and she’s determined to shuck her brainy loner persona and start afresh with a new name from the popular tv show, “The Brady Bunch” – she is now known as “Cindy” to her classmates and teachers. It is the late 1970s, and fitting in becomes more difficult as Iran makes U.S. headlines with protests, revolution, and finally the taking of American hostages. Even mood rings, and a secret crush cannot distract Cindy from the anti-Iran sentiments that creep way to close to home. Those who struggle to fit in, and who ultimately find their place among their loved ones and new school friends, will enjoy this book. You will also find yourselves rooting for Cindy as she overcomes school and family difficulties, and comes out much more confident as she works way back back to the person she really is.

You can find this book in the Rebecca Caudill Nominee section at J DUMAS.

Throwback Thursday: The Penderwicks

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall.

While vacationing with their widowed father in the Berkshire Mountains, four young sisters, ages four through twelve, share adventures with a local boy, much to the dismay of his snobbish mother.

First published in 2005, this is a modern classic that won a National Book Award in 2005. This story of siblings is perfect for readers who enjoyed Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BIRDSALL.

~aw

Beyond Lucky

beyond lucky

Today I recommend: Beyond Lucky by Sarah Aronson

Believing his luck has changed for the better after finding a rare soccer card, aspiring young goalie Ari Fish finds his athletic skills floundering in the face of a dispute between his best friend and the new girl on the team, who both accuse each other of stealing the card. Beyond Lucky is not only about soccer. It’s also about friendships and how complicated they can be in middle school. I thoroughly enjoyed this one, and was surprised by the turn of events a few times. This was a fun book that kept me guessing until the end. It’s great fiction for the middle school soccer lover or sports fan. Ari is competitive, yet relatable and endearing. And if you love the play-by-play, Aronson pulls you right into the games!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ARONSON

Book Review: Turn It Up!

Turn it up.jpgToday I recommend: Turn It Up! by Jen Calonita.

Bradley Academy’s all-girl a cappella group used to be the pride of the sunshine state, but the Nightingales have recently fallen out of harmony. When a boy comes between Nightingales co-captains Lidia and Sidney, the a cappella group appears in dire straits, until new girl Julianna hopes to bring the group back to their former glory in time for the big state final.

The plot may sound familiar- girl finds herself falling for the guy her best friend has a crush on- but the a cappella aspect of the books makes it fun to read this book anyway. If you liked Glee or Pitch Perfect, this is the book for you. Characters frequently burst into song, and spend much of their time picking out songs for their performances- you’ll need to be keeping up with music from the radio and from musicals to catch all the references. For middle school tweens looking for a light and quick read- this could be the right choice!

You can find Turn It Up! in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA CALONITA.

~aw

Book Review: The Candymakers

The CandymakersToday I recommend The Candymakers by Wendy Mass.

This awesome novel is about four contestants competing at an annual candy making competition. Throughout the whole entire novel, there is perspectives of all of the main characters. There are many twists as the plot unfurls. From each perspective, you understand more and more.

This is one of my favorite novels of all time. I have read it twice, and it is so awesome. Nothing sad or scary happens, and it is very exciting. It makes my mouth water, and the novel is cleverly written. Because of this book, I have read many others of Wendy Mass’ novels including A Mango Shaped Space. I recommend this novel to anyone who likes the Book Scavenger series, candy, or hilarious books. There is a sequel to this novel, which is just as awesome to the first one.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

This book can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MASS.