All posts by bpldinbetween

Throwback Thursday: The BFG

the bfg.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The BFG by Roald Dahl.

Snatched from her orphanage by a BFG (Big Friendly Giant), who spends his life blowing happy dreams to children, Sophie concocts with him a plan to save the world from nine other man-gobbling cannibal giants.

Roald Dahl has written a lot of wonderful books for children such as Charlie and the Chocolate Factory or James and the Giant Peach but this one is my personal favorite. Sophie is an amusing main character, and the idea of the BFG creating happy dreams for children seemed like the perfect kind of magic to me. Originally published in 1982 this book has been adapted into a movie several times most recently by Disney in 2016. Fans of fantasy fiction should check out this classic!

You can find The BFG in the Juvenile Fiction section at J DAHL.

~aw

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Book Review: All’s Faire in Middle School

All's Faire in Middle School.jpgToday I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

Homeschooled by Renaissance Fair enthusiasts, eleven-year-old Imogene has a hard time fitting in when her wish to enroll in public school is granted.

Fans of Jamieson’s graphic novel Roller Girl won’t be disappointed! Imogene is another strong female character, and the situations that she grapples with feel realistic even if growing up at a Renaissance Fair sounds far-fetched. Imogene deals with bullying and her desire to make new friends as she adjusts to going to middle school while also training to be a squire at the Ren. Faire. I recommend this to anyone who has enjoyed Awkward and Brave by Chmakova or Real Friends by Shannon Hale.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Maniac Magee

Maniac MageeThis week for Throwback Thursday we recommend: Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli.

After his parents die, Jeffrey Lionel Magee’s life becomes legendary, as he accomplishes athletic and other feats which awe his contemporaries.

Published in 1990, this book by Jerry Spinelli was an American Library Association Children’s Notable Book in 1991 and won the Illinois Reader’s Choice – Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award in 1993. Readers who enjoy realistic fiction will love this classic!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SPINELLI.

Throwback Thursday: Misty of Chincoteague

Misty of ChincoteagueFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry.

Set on Chincoteague Island, Virginia Paul and Maureen Beebe, a brother and sister, have their hearts set on owning a wild pony and her colt, who according to legend, are descendants of the Moorish ponies who survived a Spanish shipwreck long ago.

This classic is perfect for anyone who loves horses! A sweet tale of two children who eventually have a horse to call their own, Misty of Chincoteague was first published in 1947 and has been adapted as a movie. This book was also a Newbery Honor Book in 1948.

As for a local connection, author Marguerite Henry was a resident of Wayne, Illinois. Henry bought Misty and wrote the book about that horse. Each year, Misty and Henry would visit Wayne Elementary School and would celebrat the horse’s birthday with the children. http://prev.dailyherald.com/story/?id=245797

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HENRY.

~aw

2018 Reading Resolution!

It’s that time of the year again – New Years Resolutions! Last year I challenged myself to read 100 books during 2017, and unfortunately I fell a little short at 87 books.

So for 2018, I’ve decided to try again. My reading challenge is once again 100 books and I will be using Goodreads to keep track – it gives you some fun stats such as keeping track of the number of pages that you read. Hopefully this year will be the year I make it.

Did anyone have a 2017 reading resolution or does anyone else have a reading resolution for 2018?

~aw

Slider

Slider.jpgToday I recommend Slider by Pete Hautman.

Hoping to win a cash prize in a pizza eating contest after racking up a tab on his mother’s credit card, David must juggle his competitive eating training with the responsibility of looking after his autistic younger brother.

This book has it all – suspense, friendship, and horrifyingly gross descriptions of competitive eating. It addresses David’s feelings of being the ‘forgotten’ middle child in his family without ever losing the humor that is necessarily part the book as David works to stretch his stomach and win a competitive eating contest in order to pay back his mom. I winced a little every time he decided to hide his mistake and lie a little more but that situation certainly added to the suspense of the story – you’ll want to know whether or not David can win right from the beginning!

You can find Slider in the Juvenile Fiction section at J HAUTMAN.

~aw

If You Liked Jumanji (2017)…

You might have heard about the new Jumanji movie, and if you have then you probably know that it is about four teens getting sucked into a video game where they can’t go home until they beat the game! We love the “trapped in a video game” trope and have rounded up some books to share:

Click Here to Start by Denis Markell: Juvenile Fiction J MARKELL – When Ted inherits his uncle’s apartment “and all the treasure within,” he realizes the apartment is set up like a real-life video game and must solve the puzzles with his friends to discover the treasure.

Insert Coin to Continue by John David Anderson: Juvenile Fiction J ANDERSON – Middle-schooler Bryan wakes up to find that his life has become a video game, with bullies to beat, races to run, puzzles to solve, and much more at stake.

Heir Apparent by Vivian Vande Velde: While playing a total immersion virtual reality game of kings and intrigue, fourteen-year-old Giannine learns that demonstrators have damaged the equipment to which she is connected, and she must win the game quickly or be damaged herself.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Holes

Holes.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Holes by Louis Sachar.

As further evidence of his family’s bad fortune which they attribute to a curse on a distant relative, Stanley Yelnats is sent to a hellish correctional camp in the Texas desert where he finds his first real friend, a treasure, and a new sense of himself.

I read the book well before the movie was released but I am always happy to recommend this book and the movie! This is a fun adventure story that focuses on a friendship that grows to include all of the boys who are prisoners of a terrible correctional camp in Texas. This book is also quite the award winner – Newbery Medal, Illinois’ Rebecca Caudill Award in 2002, and an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book in 1999. Published in 1998, this book is not as old as some that I recommend but it is certainly a classic.

You can find it in the Juvenile Fiction section at J SACHAR.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: The Hundred Dresses

the hundred dresses.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes.

None of her classmates pay much attention to Wanda Petronski, a Polish-American girl, until she announces she has 100 dresses in her closet. Everyone laughs and teases her so much that she stops coming to school. Then, her classmates discover she really does have 100 dresses and discover something about teasing and themselves.

The Hundred Dresses by Eleanor Estes is the tale of a young girl, Wanda,  who is bullied by her classmates for wearing the same dress each day to school. Wanda tells her peers that she has one hundred dresses at home, but everyone knows that it is not true.  As a result, Wanda is bullied even more.  One day, Wanda is pulled out of the school and the class begins to feel terrible for their behavior toward her.  Maddie, a student from Wanda’s class, decides that she needs to take a stand so no classmate is bullied ever again.  If you like stories that are heart-felt and teach a lesson, then The Hundred Dresses is for you!

This classic story first published in 1944 was a Newbery Honor Book in 1945, and can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ESTES.

~kf

Norse Myths: Tales of Odin, Thor, and Loki

norse mythsToday I recommend: Norse Myths: Tales of Odin, Thor, and Loki by Kevin Crossley-Holland.

Collects tales of Norse mythology featuring the powerful Odin, Thor and his hammer Mjolnir, Loki, the final battle of Ragnarok, and power struggles among the figures.

This is a gorgeous nonfiction book about Norse mythology full of striking mostly black and white illustrations that add a sense of tension throughout the book. It’s long, 225 pages, but with 20 different tales included there is a lot to read. Some of the tales can get a little gruesome but this book is perfect for middle schoolers who are curious about the myths that have inspired Rick Riordan’s Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard series.

This book can be found in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j398.209 CROSSLEY-HOLLAND.

~aw