All posts by bpldinbetween

Mary Poppins Returns

Did you know that Mary Poppins is not just a movie but is also a book series? The sceond Mary Poppins movie, Mary Poppins Returns, will be released in theaters on December 19 so you still have time to check out the books here at the library (Juvenile Fiction – J TRAVERS).

~aw

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Book Review: I Am Princess X

I am Princess XToday I recommend: I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest.

I Am Princess X starts out with 2 best friends, May and Libby. They create a cool character named princess X who carries a samurai sword, lives in a haunted house and wears red chuck Taylors. Later, sad things happen and Libby and her mother pass away, and their princess X stories and drawings are accidentaly thrown out. A couple years later, May is lonely without her best friend, but then starts seeing princess X everywhere, stickers and patches and merchandise of all sorts, and there is a web comic of the princess. May is convinced that Libby did not actually die, but is waiting to be helped and found by May, writing clues in the webcomic for help. But is it actually true, is her best friend alive? Find out more once you read the book.

I absolutely loved this book very much. Most of it was in novel form, but the princess X webcomic strips were included throughout the story as comics. The comics were beautifully drawn and the words were very descriptive. I recommend this book to whoever likes suspense, mystery and comics.  

-Elizabeth N. Teen Blogger

You can find I am Princess X in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA PRIEST. This book was also on the Illinois Reader’s Choice Award List – Rebecca Caudill Young Reader’s Book Award list in 2018.

Book Review: First Rule of Punk

First rule of punk.jpgToday I recommend: The First Rule of Punk by Celia C. Perez.

    The First Rule of Punk is an awesome fictional novel about a Mexican punk rocker middle schooler, Malu. Malu is moving to Chicago with her mother who loves Mexican heritage, far away from Malu’s father who owns a small record shop. She does not have any friends, until she tries to start up a band with some classmates for the school talent show. Will Malu’s band be good enough to get  into the talent show, and will she make friends? Read this novel to find out more.

I loved this book! It is different from other books I have read. This one is about being who you are, the importance of heritage, being a tough punk rocker and staying strong. My favorite character was Ellie, the band’s guitarist. She was very confident and smart, and was not afraid to speak up for what is right, always making petitions and helping others. I really enjoyed this novel, and I hope that you will too.

-Elizabeth N, Teen Blogger

You can find The First Rule of Punk in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PEREZ, and during the 2018-2019 school year on our Battle of the Books shelf.

Throwback Thursday: Harriet the Spy

Harriet the spy.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh.

Eleven-year-old Harriet keeps notes on her classmates and neighbors in a secret notebook, but when some of the students read the notebook, they seek revenge.

For amateur detectives, and readers who enjoyed Boxcar Children, Hardy Boys, and Nancy Drew this is a great classic! Harriet the Spy was first published in 1964, and like many of the Throwback Thursday Classics has also been adapted into a movie. We also have it available as an audiobook at the library.

You can find the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FITZHUGH and the audiobook at J CD FITZHUGH.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: The Call of the Wild

call of the wild.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Call of the Wild by Jack London.

The adventures of an unusual dog, forcibly taken to the Klondike gold field, where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

Originally published in 1903, this classic was quickly adapted into a movie in 1923, and has been adapted into a movie several other times since then. This classic is for readers who enjoy more tense drama, it is not a standard happy animal story.

You can find The Call of the Wild in the  Juvenile Fiction section at J LONDON.

~aw

 

 

Book Review: Swing It, Sunny

swing itToday’s recommended read is: Swing It, Sunny by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.

It’s autumn and Sunny is back home and starting middle school.  Dale her brother has been sent to a boarding school to help with his drug problems.  Sunny misses him terribly and her fun is often interrupted by thoughts of him, thoughts that are often completely unrelated to what Sunny is doing.  When Dale returns home for the holidays feeling angry and betrayed by his family, it’s Gramps who helps Sunny see the sunny side of things again.  Through it all, Sunny tries to stay positive and learns we can’t always fix everything.

If you like this book you may like DRAMA by Raina Telgemeier or All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

~PH

You can find this book in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC HOLM.

Book Review: Illegal

illegal by eoin colferToday I recommend: Illegal by Eoin Colfer.

Ebo is alone. His brother, Kwame, has disappeared, and Ebo knows it can only be to attempt the hazardous journey to Europe, and a better life, the same journey their sister set out on months ago. But Ebo refuses to be left behind in Ghana. He sets out after Kwame and joins him on the quest to reach Europe. Ebo’s epic journey takes him across the Sahara Desert to the dangerous streets of Tripoli, and finally out to the merciless sea. But with every step he holds on to his hope for a new life, and a reunion with his family.

As the author notes although Illegal is a work of fiction all of the different portions of it are true, and events similar to what happen to Ebo happen to children, teens, and adults each day. This graphic novel is a compassionate look at the plight of refugees and immigrants. Readers will gain empathy for Ebo as the novel does not shy away from the terrible events that happen to him but his positive outlook lessens the overwhelming nature of the tragedies. The graphic novel would be an excellent teaching tool- to combine with history lessons or current events. Readers who enjoy graphic novel memoirs or graphic novel nonfiction such as Spinning by Walden or March by Lewis should check out this book.

You can find Illegal by Eoin Colfer in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC COLFER.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: My Side of the Mountain

my side of the mountainFor this Throwback Thursday the recommended read is: My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George.

A young boy relates his adventures during the year he spends living alone in the Catskill Mountains including his struggle for survival, his dependence on nature, his animal friends, and his ultimate realization that he needs human companionship.

First published in 1959, this classic tale of survival and adventure was a Newbery honor book in 1960. The sequel to this book, On the Far Side of the Mountain was published many years later in 1990. This classic is perfect for reader’s who enjoy survival stories like Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

You can find My Side of the Mountain  in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GEORGE.

~PS, aw

Book Review: Strongheart

strongheart.jpgToday’s recommend read is: Strongheart: Wonder Dog of the Silver Screen by Candace Fleming.

A German shepherd is transformed from Etzel, a police dog in Berlin, to Strongheart, a silent movie star that will need his best acting skills to prove himself innocent of attacking a girl.

Readers who love animals will be interested in this book based on the true story of the German Shepard dog, Strongheart, who was a silent film star in the 1920s. The illustrations throughout are charming and the inclusion of back-matter with photographs of the dog and explanations of which sections are facts and which are embellished should help satisfy the curiosity of young readers.

You can find Strongheart: Wonder Dog of the Silver Screen in the Juvenile Fiction section at J FLEMING.

~PS, aw

Book Review: Bubbles

Bubbles.jpgToday’s recommended read is: Bubbles by Abby Cooper.

While trying to cheer up her depressed mother, twelve-year-old Sophie gets roped into doing a triathlon as part of a school project on risk-taking, and discovers she can see people’s thoughts in bubbles above their heads.

This middle-grade novel deals with important topics including depression, therapy, preteen insecurities, and more. While seeing people’s thoughts sounds exciting Sophie quickly learns that you may not want to know what other people are thinking- luckily she has some good friends on her side. For middle-grade readers who like their realistic fiction to have a feel-good ending and don’t mind some low fantasy elements.

You can find this novel in the Juvenile Fiction section at J COOPER.

~BE, aw