All posts by bpldinbetween

Throwback Thursday: Anne of Green Gables

anne of green gables.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery.

Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent by mistake to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm.

First published in 1908, this is another great classic book of historical fiction that has been adapted into many movies. This would be great for anyone who enjoyed the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder or the more recently published When Mischief Came to Town by Katrina Nannestad.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MONTGOMERY.

~aw

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Book Review: Hello Universe

hello universe.jpgToday I recommend: Hello Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly.

Lives of four misfits are intertwined when a bully’s prank lands shy Virgil at the bottom of a well and Valencia, Kaori, and Gen band together in an epic quest to find and rescue him.

This book was the winner of the 2018 John Newbery Medal, which is awarded by the Association of Library Service to Children to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children during the year. What I loved most about this book was how unique each character was – each one was struggling with feeling different and struggling with their own personal fears but each one also had their own strengths. I really loved all of the little stories that Virgil’s grandmother Lola told him to try and cheer him up, and the illustrations of Virgil’s guinea pig Gulliver at the beginning of chapters added charm to the whole book. There’s a little bit of something for everyone in this book – I especially recommend it to those who like stories of friendship and self-acceptance and for people who like stories where the characters learn to stand up to bullies!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KELLY.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Little House in the Big Woods

Little house in the big woods.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

A year in the life of two young girls growing up on the Wisconsin frontier, as they help their mother with the daily chores, enjoy their father’s stories and singing, and share special occasions when they get together with relatives or neighbors.

This is the book that started the well known series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. It was first published in 1932. I loved this book as a kid, and first encountered it when my mother read it to me aloud. Laura is a protagonist who is easy to cheer for and it is touching to read about her as she grows up. This classic is a perfect choice for those who love historical fiction or are interested in pioneers.

You can find Little House in the Big Woods and the rest of this series by Laura Ingalls Wilder in the Juvenile Fiction section at J WILDER.

~aw

Book Review: The Doll People

the doll people.jpgToday I recommend: The Doll People by Ann M. Martin.

A family of porcelain dolls that has lived in the same house for one hundred years is taken aback when a new family of plastic dolls arrives and doesn’t follow The Doll Code of Honor.

The final list for 2018-2019 Battle of the Books has been released and I am excited to start highlighting some of the fantastic books on this list. The Doll People was published in 2002, and is a fantastic tale for anyone who has wondered what toys would do if they were alive. The drawings in the book by Brain Selznick really bring the doll families to life. It is also a heartwarming story about learning to accept people’s differences and to be true to yourself (the two doll families have very different ideas of what is acceptable when it comes to moving around and risking being seen by the humans). I think anyone who enjoyed The Borrowers or who enjoys Ann M. Martin’s other books would love this book.

You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MARTIN.

~aw

 

Throwback Thursday: A Little Princess

A Little Princess.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday we’re highlighting: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin’s London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

This book was first published in 1905 (and was an expanded version of a short story that had been published in 1888), and has been adapted into many different movies – one of the most well known stars Shirley Temple.

~aw

Book Review: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

Vanderbeekers of 141st Street.jpgI recommend the book, “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” by Karina Yan Glaser. 

The Vanderbeeker family have been happily living in their Harlem brownstone apartment unit their landlord refuses to renew their lease.  Now, they have five days before Christmas to convince him to let them stay.  Each of the five siblings craft a different strategy to change his mind.

~ps

All’s Faire in Middle School

Today I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

All’s Faire in Middle School is a fictional graphic novel about Imogene, a girl who is homeschooled and whose parents work at a medieval faire. Her father acts as an evil night, and her mother runs a shop. Imogene is about to embark on her own journey, middle school! She doesn’t know if she will make any friends or fit in at middle school, but she tries anyway. She faces a strict science teacher, sort of teasing and bossy friends, homework, and many other things.

I really enjoyed this book. It was funny, and the art style is cartoonish and cool. I loved this book because it had a lot to do with medieval fairs, old english and the craziness of middle school. Imogene’s life and problems were often compared to folk tales and dragons. I suggest this graphic novel to who ever likes medieval times or graphic novels. Victoria Jamieson also wrote Roller Girl, a wonderful graphic novel about a girl learning how to roller skate.

~Elizabeth, Teen Blogger

You can find All’s Faire in Middle School in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

Throwback Thursday: The Boxcar Children

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner.

Henry, Jessie, Violet and Benny Alden are brothers and sisters – and they’re orphans. The only way they can stay together is to make it on their own. One night, during a storm, the children find an old red boxcar that keeps them warm and safe. They decide to make it their home.The Boxcar Children.jpg

The first book in the series serves as the introduction to these four plucky orphans and the boxcar that they turn into their home but the series quickly focuses on the children’s abilities to solve mysteries. The first book, The Boxcar Children, was published in 1924 and written by Gertrude Chandler Warner who went on to write the first 19 books in the series. Other authors have contributed the other books in this popular series which numbers over 130 books and continue to be published today!

You can find the Boxcar Children series in the Juvenile Mystery section at J MYSTERY WARNER.

~aw

Book Review: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament

Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament.jpgToday I recommend: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament by Anne Renaud.

When a fussy patron sends his order of potatoes back twice, chef George Crum decides to have some fun, based on the true story of the potato chip.

This book is an enjoyable mix of both history and a good dose of your classic tall tale. What makes this one specially nice is the inclusion of some back matter that gives information about the real-life Mr. Crum and the photographs of the restaurant which explains how even if eh was not the original inventor of the potato chip that his version was certainly well-known. Hand this to anyone who enjoys humor and anyone who loves this classic snack.

You can find this book in the Easy Fiction section at E RENAUD.

~aw