Monthly Archives: July 2018

Throwback Thursday: The Borrowers

The borrowers.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

Miniature people who live in an old country house by borrowing things from the humans are forced to emigrate from their home under the clock.

What could be more fascinating than the idea that there could be tiny people hiding in your own house- borrowing things and living just under your nose? This classic children’s novel was the inspiration for the Disney and Studio Ghibli movie The Secret World of Arrietty. First published in 1952 in the United Kingdom and 1953 in the United States- this book also won the British Carnegie Medal in 1952 which is awarded to the year’s most outstanding children’s literature by a British author. This is great for reader’s who enjoyed books like The Doll People by Ann M Martin.

You can find this classic in the Juvenile Fiction section at J NORTON.

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: The Wind in the Willows

the wind in the willows.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame.

The escapades of four animal friends who live along a river in the English countryside – Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger. When Mr. Toad gets a new motor car, he gets them all in trouble.

First published in 1908 – this classic children’s novel is for readers who like animal stories full of antics. This classic has been adapted in various stage plays, musicals, and, of course, movies! You can find it at the library in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GRAHAME.

~aw

Book Review: Paper Things

Paper Things.jpgPaper Things – Jennifer Jacobson

Paper Things is a thrilling novel by Jennifer Jacobson that tells the life of a nineteen-year-old Gage and his younger sister being homeless for six weeks. When Ari’s mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So, when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she must go with him. But it’s been two months, and Gage still hasn’t found them an apartment. He and Ari have been “couch surfing,” staying with Gage’s friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage’s girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama?

This novel will engender empathy and understanding of a serious and all-too-real problem. Jacobson’s story is poignant but never preachy. — School Library Journal


Paper Things by Jennifer Jacobson is a heart-touching novel and is originally published on February 10, 2015. Paper Things is a Rebecca Caudill 2019 nominee and has won several awards such as, the ILA Social Justice Literature Award for Fiction winner, and Hudson Bookseller’s Best of Summer 2015. I would recommend Paper Things to a reader that is looking for a thrilling novel.

~Vishnu, Teen Blogger

You can find Paper Things on the Rebecca Caudill shelf during the 2018-19, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J JACOBSEN.

Happy National Ice Cream Month!

Celebrate National Ice Cream Month by checking out these books with ice cream on the cover from our Juvenile Fiction section!

A Snicker of Magic by Natalie Lloyd JCD FIC LLOYD – The Pickles are new to Midnight Gulch, Tennessee, a town which legend says was once magic–but Felicity is convinced the magic is still there, and with the help of her new friend Jonah the Beedle she hopes to bring the magic back.

Sprinkle Sundays by Coco Simon J SIMON – When Allie and her mother move one town away after her parents’ divorce, Allie must find a way to stay close to her best friends Sierra and Tamiko.

The Chocolate Sundae Mystery by Gertrude Warner JPLWY WARNER – The Boxcar children investigate when ice cream and other items start disappearing from their favorite ice cream parlor.

~aw

Book Review: Pablo and Birdy

Pablo and Birdy

Today I recommend: Pablo and Birdy by Alison McGhee and illustrated by Ana Juan.

This descriptive novel is about a boy named Pablo and his lavender colored parrot, called Birdy. One morning, during the change of winds, baby Pablo and birdy washed up on the shore of Isla floating on a tiny baby pool wrapped in twine. Emanuel, a shop owner took Pablo in and raised him. Birdy was always by Pablo’s side. Birdy was like Pablo’s guardian and friend. But when Pablo turns ten, he wants to know who his parents are, where he came from, and other things like that. And besides that, there are the legends of the Sea Farring parrot, a mystical parrot that can hear all sounds and noises of the world at anytime.

This  book was amazingly descriptive, very funny and touching. There were funny characters, including a group of parrots and a chicken called the committee. I listened to the audiobook version, and it was hilarious. My favorite character is the pastry stealing dog because he is funny and does not learn his lesson.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find the audiobook in the Juvenile Audiobook section at jCD FIC MCGHEE, and the book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MCGHEE.

 

Throwback Thursday: The Hobbit

The Hobbit.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien.

Bilbo Baggins, a respectable, well-to-do hobbit, lives comfortably in his hobbit-hole until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return. He becomes a thief for a band of dwarves and soon finds himself in the midst of a war with the evil goblins and wargs, and forced to make a decision between the call of duty and the pull of the simple life.

More accessible to younger readers than the Lord of the Rings trilogy (and much better than The Hobbit movies by Peter Jackson) this is a great epic fantasy classic for children. This book was first published in January 1937 in the U.K. For those who enjoy detailed world building, memorable characters, and a great adventure and quest this is a good recommendation – readers who enjoyed The Chronicles of Narnia may also enjoy this book.

You can find The Hobbit in the Juvenile Fiction section at J TOLKIEN, and the Young Adult Fiction section at YA TOLKIEN.

~aw

Book Review: The Wizard’s Dog

The Wizards DogToday I recommend: The Wizard’s Dog by Eric Kahn Gale.

When his master and best friend, Merlin, is kidnapped, there is nothing Nosewise the dog will not do to get Merlin back, even if it means facing the strange Fae people and their magic-eating worms, or tangling with the mysterious Sword in the Stone.

This book is hilarious- Nosewise, the wizard Merlin’s dog, is the narrator for the book and his point of view makes for an enjoyable read. A dog’s opinion on many things differs from that of the human companions he gains along the way to rescue his master Merlin- for example Nosewise believes that being the “poop-boy” who cleans the chamber pots is a huge honor while Arthur disagrees. This book is perfect for elementary school students who love dog books especially ones written from the point of view of the dog, and anyone who enjoys legend, and magical fantasy stories.

This is one of the fiction books for the 2018-2019 season of Battle of the Books. You can find this book on the Battle of the Books shelf for the 2018-2019 season, and in the Juvenile Fiction section at J GALE.

~aw

Camp Nanowrimo

Have you ever wanted to write a novel or thought about participating in Nanowrimo? Sometimes November is a difficult or busy month, and sometimes 50,000 words just seems like too much to tackle!Camp Nanowrimo

If you have ever had these thoughts then Camp Nanowrimo is for you! Camp Nanowrimo allows you to set your own word goal (it can be any number that you want – big or small!), and join a cabin of fellow writers to cheer each other on. Camp Nanowrimo runs twice each year: once in April and once in July. Best of all you can watch your progress on a handy little target, it sure motivates me when I watch the arrow get closer to the bullseye.

You can sign up at: https://campnanowrimo.org/ Is anyone thinking about giving it a shot?