Monthly Archives: June 2018

Book Review: Ghost Boys

Ghost boys.jpgJerome, a twelve-year-old black boy, is shot.  A white officer said he had a gun.  No first aid is offered.  Jerome dies, however, his story does not end.  He comes back as a ghost and witnesses the events that unfold in the aftermath of his shooting and death.  To follow Jerome’s journey in the afterlife, pick up a copy of Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes.

~KF

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J RHODES.

Advertisements

Throwback Thursday: The Little Prince

The Little Prince.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.

An aviator whose plane is forced down in the Sahara Desert encounters a little prince from a small planet who relates his adventures in seeking the secret of what is important in life.

This is a charming illustrated book whose slim size can be rather deceiving as the tale is an allegory. First published in 1943, this book has often been assigned as a part of school reading and is now a part of the Great American Read 2018 run by PBS. This is recommended for anyone who enjoyed Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland or Barrie’s Peter Pan.

You can find this book in the Young Adult Fiction section at YA SAINT-EXUPERY.

~aw

Book Review: The Candymakers

The CandymakersToday I recommend The Candymakers by Wendy Mass.

This awesome novel is about four contestants competing at an annual candy making competition. Throughout the whole entire novel, there is perspectives of all of the main characters. There are many twists as the plot unfurls. From each perspective, you understand more and more.

This is one of my favorite novels of all time. I have read it twice, and it is so awesome. Nothing sad or scary happens, and it is very exciting. It makes my mouth water, and the novel is cleverly written. Because of this book, I have read many others of Wendy Mass’ novels including A Mango Shaped Space. I recommend this novel to anyone who likes the Book Scavenger series, candy, or hilarious books. There is a sequel to this novel, which is just as awesome to the first one.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

This book can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J MASS.

Book Review: The Amulet of Samarkand (Graphic Novel)

amulet of samarkand.jpgToday I recommend The Amulet of Samarkand A Bartimaeus Graphic Novel by Jonathan Stroud, Andrew Donkin, Lee Sullivan and Nicolas Chapuis.

This graphic novel is about a young magician boy and a powerful djinni, a type of demon named Bartimaeus. The graphic novel switches between both of their perspectives. The boy orders Bartimaeus to steal from a powerful magician, a thing that even he, a very powerful demon, has a hard time doing.

I thought this novel was really cool. It has magic, suspense and is a graphic novel. It is not too sad, but has a couple explosions. Bartimaeus, the demon, is very funny and witty, always trying to get out of doing the boy’s wishes. Bartimaeus is a lot like a genie except does not live in a tight space, has unlimited wishes, and has dark humor. The main boy is very ambitious and also very bitter about the past. I liked this novel a lot. I suggest this novel to who ever likes magic, suspense and of course, demons.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC STROUD.

Throwback Thursday: The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

from the mixed-up files of mrs. basil e frankweiler.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg.

Claudia and her brother run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she sees a statue so beautiful, she must identify its sculptor. To find out, she must visit the statue’s former owner, the elderly Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Originally published in 1967, this book won the Newbery Medal for excellence in children’s literature in 1968. This was also adapted into a movie as many of the classics that we highlighted have been. The main characters Claudia and Jamie make this a charming novel and an enjoyable mystery perfect for any reader who enjoyed The Westing Game by Raskin or Chasing Vermeer by Balliett.

This classic can be found in the Juvenile Fiction section at J KONIGSBURG.

~aw

Book Review: Ghost

Ghost by Jason Reynolds.pngGHOST – Jason Reynolds

Ghost is a young adult novel by Jason Reynolds which follows seventh-grader Castle “Ghost” Cranshaw as he joins a track team and struggles to deal with his past and his present. Ever since his father went to jail, Castle Cranshaw’s life suddenly switched directions. He was behind in school, always in trouble, and didn’t have the money for essential needs. One day, when Ghost impulsively challenges an elite sprinter to a race-and wins- the Olympic medalist track coach sees that he has something: crazy natural talent. Only with the dreams of playing ball, he unexpectedly joined the track team. Ghost doesn’t only get bullied in school for not having good clothes, but also on his track team (Defenders). Mainly because he doesn’t have running shoes. He then steals a pair of shiny sliver running shoes to shut down all the bullies. Eventually, coach finds out and plans to tell Ghost’s mother. Until he started begging not to. All the trouble-making, all the stealing, and all the bullying comes down to this one point in Ghost’s life. The first track meet of the season. Can Ghost harness his raw talent for speed and meld with the team, or will his past finally catch up to him?

Ghost by Jason Reynolds originally published on August 30, 2016, is one of the finalists for the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature. Ghost is also the first book in Jason Reynolds’s explosive Track series about a fast but fiery group of kids who have a shot at the Junior Olympics, but have a lot to prove first-to each other, and to themselves. I would recommend this book to readers that are searching for a thriller, as well as meaningful book in their lives.

Another poignant, engaging, exciting novel that combines middle school, sports, and life lessons from Coretta Scott King Honor author Jason Reynolds – commonsensemedia.org

~Vishnu S., Teen Blogger

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J REYNOLDS.

Book Review: Roller Girl

Roller GirlToday I recommend Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson.

Roller Girl is a very inspiring graphic novel about a girl named Astrid who decides to join a roller derby camp in the summer after she saw a roller derby game.  She expects her best friend to also sign up, but she does not. Astrid deals with disappointment, friends, lies and getting a lot of bruises.

I loved this book. I have read it two and a half times, and I find it really inspiring. Around the time of when I read this book for the first time, I was scared to roller skate. But after a year, I had read this book again, and I went roller skating. I realized how accurate Roller Girl is. The book was right, when skating, you get a lot of bruises. I recommend this book to fans of the graphic novel Brave.

-Teen book blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find Roller Girl in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

Throwback Thursday: The Westing Game

The westing game.jpgAfter a short break, we’re back! For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin.

The mysterious death of an eccentric millionaire brings together an unlikely assortment of heirs who must uncover the circumstances of his death before they can claim their inheritance.

This is fun classic mystery- first published in 1978! This book also won the Newbery Medal Award in 1979. There is a really enjoyable plot especially interesting as every character is competing to win the inheritance money. This is perfect for mystery readers and those who enjoyed books such as The Mysterious Benedict Society and From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E . Frankweiler.

You can find it in the Juvenile Mystery section at J RASKIN.

~aw

Book Review: Love, Penelope

love penelope.jpgToday I Recommend Love, Penelope written by Joanne Rocklin and illustrated by Lucy Knisley.

Love, Penelope is an illustrated novel about a basketball loving girl named Penelope who can’t wait to welcome her new baby sister to the world.  Penelope is in fifth grade and lives with her two mothers with happiness. Penelope writes every day in her journal about her life, addressing them all to her soon to be baby sister.  Penelope and her friends face big problems and try to overcome them together, like fabrications (lies), school projects, heritage and family.

I loved this novel so much. Penelope is very lovable with the big words she uses and the jokes she and her friends tell.  One of my favorite things in this novel has to be the fact that one of Penelope’s friend owns a goat. The goat helps calm down the girls by letting the girls pet itself and get milked. This book was very enjoyable and I recommend this book to anyone because it covers a lot of topics that is very diverse.

~Teen blogger, Elizabeth N.

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J ROCKLIN.

Book Review: The Croc Ate my Homework

croc ate my homework.jpgA know-it-all rat, a naïve pig, a zebra with predators for his neighbors, and a crocodile family that just can’t seem to get it right….go on an adventure with the characters in The Croc Ate My Homework by Stephan T. Pastis.  This Graphic Novel will keep you laughing from the first page until the last one.

~KF

You can find this in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC PASTIS.