Monthly Archives: March 2018

2018 Bluestem Award Winner

The votes have been tallied and the winner has been announced for the 2018 Illinois Reader’s Choice Bluestem Award:

  1. Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson (4256 votes)
  2. HiLo: The Boy Who Crashed to Earth by Judd Winnick (2797 votes)
  3. The Wild Robot by Peter Brown (2582 votes)

Did you vote? Did your favorite win?

~aw

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Throwback Thursday: A Little Princess

A Little Princess.jpgFor this Throwback Thursday we’re highlighting: A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin’s London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

This book was first published in 1905 (and was an expanded version of a short story that had been published in 1888), and has been adapted into many different movies – one of the most well known stars Shirley Temple.

~aw

Book Review: The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street

Vanderbeekers of 141st Street.jpgI recommend the book, “The Vanderbeekers of 141st Street” by Karina Yan Glaser. 

The Vanderbeeker family have been happily living in their Harlem brownstone apartment unit their landlord refuses to renew their lease.  Now, they have five days before Christmas to convince him to let them stay.  Each of the five siblings craft a different strategy to change his mind.

~ps

All’s Faire in Middle School

Today I recommend: All’s Faire in Middle School by Victoria Jamieson.

All’s Faire in Middle School is a fictional graphic novel about Imogene, a girl who is homeschooled and whose parents work at a medieval faire. Her father acts as an evil night, and her mother runs a shop. Imogene is about to embark on her own journey, middle school! She doesn’t know if she will make any friends or fit in at middle school, but she tries anyway. She faces a strict science teacher, sort of teasing and bossy friends, homework, and many other things.

I really enjoyed this book. It was funny, and the art style is cartoonish and cool. I loved this book because it had a lot to do with medieval fairs, old english and the craziness of middle school. Imogene’s life and problems were often compared to folk tales and dragons. I suggest this graphic novel to who ever likes medieval times or graphic novels. Victoria Jamieson also wrote Roller Girl, a wonderful graphic novel about a girl learning how to roller skate.

~Elizabeth, Teen Blogger

You can find All’s Faire in Middle School in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC JAMIESON.

Throwback Thursday: The Boxcar Children

For this Throwback Thursday I recommend: The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner.

Henry, Jessie, Violet and Benny Alden are brothers and sisters – and they’re orphans. The only way they can stay together is to make it on their own. One night, during a storm, the children find an old red boxcar that keeps them warm and safe. They decide to make it their home.The Boxcar Children.jpg

The first book in the series serves as the introduction to these four plucky orphans and the boxcar that they turn into their home but the series quickly focuses on the children’s abilities to solve mysteries. The first book, The Boxcar Children, was published in 1924 and written by Gertrude Chandler Warner who went on to write the first 19 books in the series. Other authors have contributed the other books in this popular series which numbers over 130 books and continue to be published today!

You can find the Boxcar Children series in the Juvenile Mystery section at J MYSTERY WARNER.

~aw

Book Review: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament

Mr. Crum's Potato Predicament.jpgToday I recommend: Mr. Crum’s Potato Predicament by Anne Renaud.

When a fussy patron sends his order of potatoes back twice, chef George Crum decides to have some fun, based on the true story of the potato chip.

This book is an enjoyable mix of both history and a good dose of your classic tall tale. What makes this one specially nice is the inclusion of some back matter that gives information about the real-life Mr. Crum and the photographs of the restaurant which explains how even if eh was not the original inventor of the potato chip that his version was certainly well-known. Hand this to anyone who enjoys humor and anyone who loves this classic snack.

You can find this book in the Easy Fiction section at E RENAUD.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Hatchet

HatchetFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen.

After a plane crash, thirteen-year-old Brian spends fifty-four days in the wilderness, learning to survive initially with only the aid of a hatchet given him by his mother, and learning also to survive his parents’ divorce.

First published in 1987, this book has made countless school reading lists and was an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book in 1988. You can’t look away from this book as Brian struggles to survive on his own. This is a gripping adventure story, and is most suitable for those older children who have moved past the I Survived series by Tarshis.

You can find Hatchet in the Juvenile Fiction section at J PAULSEN.

~aw

Pi Day!

Happy Pi Day from all of us at the Bartlett Public Library! We celebrate today as Pi day since the pidate, March 14th, is the same as the first three digits of π (3.14).

You can learn more about the mathematical concept of Pi in Why Pi? by Johnny Ball, in our juvenile nonfiction section at j530.8 BALL.

You can celebrate Pi Day with challenges from NASA scientists and engineers as part of their Pi Day Challenge! Good luck!

Book Review: Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth

sputnik's guide to life on earth.jpgToday I recommend: Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth by Frank Cottrell Boyce.

Sputnik’s Guide to Life on Earth by Frank Cottrell Boyce tells the story of a young boy named Prez who is staying with a foster family for the summer.  While staying with the family, a visitor comes knocking on the door.  Prez sees the visitor as one thing, while many others see something else.  The visitor, named Sputnik, works with Prez to, hopefully, write a guide to life on earth and save it from destruction.  If you like science fiction novels, this book is a must read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J COTTRELL BOYCE.

~kf