Monthly Archives: October 2017

National Novel Writing Month

Have you ever wanted to write a book? Well you’re in luck! November is National Novel Writing Month (also known as Nanowrimo). The challenge is to write 50,000 words during the month of November. The goal of this challenge is to encourage writing! You do not need to make your story perfect on the first draft, and Nanowrimo is about writing your first draft, defeating writer’s block and ignoring your ‘inner editor’. To learn more about Nanowrimo and to sign up you can visit: http://nanowrimo.org/

Every Wednesday you can check in here, and see how the librarian is doing with her novel.

Image courtesy of National Novel Writing Month.

For information about writing including tips you can check out previous Nanowrimo pep talks, and books at the library (click here)!

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Swing It, Sunny!

swing itToday I recommend: Swing It, Sunny! by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm.

In the mid-1970s Sunny Lewin is back, star of her personal show, facing the prospect of Middle School, and dealing with the problems of her somewhat dysfunctional family–in particular her older brother, Dale, who has been sent off to a military academy because of his delinquent behavior.

This is the sequel to the graphic novel, Sunny Side Up, and it picks up right where the first one left off. Sunny is now back at home and is still struggling to deal with her brother’s anger, and the stress that her family is under. The artwork while mostly bright and cartoony turns darker when Sunny is facing her fears about her brother. While mostly upbeat the graphic novel does tackle serious ideas such as guilt and anxiety. This is great for fans of Raina Telgemeier and anyone who enjoyed Sunny Side Up.

You can find this graphic novel in the Juvenile Graphic Novel section at J GRAPHIC HOLM.

~aw

Oh my gourd, It’s National Pumpkin Day!

That’s right, October 26th is National Pumpkin Day. In a month filled with pumpkin spice treats, and jack-o-lanterns today is the day that we celebrate pumpkins. Some clever staff members have decorated pumpkins that you can see at the Bartlett Public Library on the shelves near the circulation desk! Check them out if you stop by!

pumpkins

Throwback Thursday: The Secret Garden

It’s Throwback Thursday! Today I recommend: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett.secret garden

Ten-year-old orphan Mary Lennox, sent from India to England to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors with her unpleasant uncle, discovers an abandoned and unusual garden on the north country estate and invalid cousin.

First published in 1909, this is a charming tale about an orphan girl who while originally unpleasant due to being alone and abandoned slowly grows to realize that she does not have to be alone and tries to help both her cousin and the abandoned garden. This story has also been adapted in a movie released in 2009. Librarian Mrs. Rose recommends this book!

You can find The Secret Garden in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BURNETT.

 

Jazz Day

jazz dayToday I recommend: Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill.

A collection of poems recounts the efforts of Esquire magazine graphic designer Art Kane to photograph a group of famous jazz artists in front of a Harlem brownstone.

This is an interesting book of poetry, where all of the poems relate to the people and events that were a part of the photograph that inspired Roxane Orgill’s poetry. The author’s notes at the end include biographies of the musicians, and a set of foldout pages include a reproduction of the photograph. I recommend this for anyone interested in jazz music, as well as anyone who wants to read nonfiction without just reading a list of facts.

You can find Jazz Day in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j811.54 ORGILL.

~aw

Throwback Thursday: Howl’s Moving Castle

howlsFor this Throwback Thursday I recommend: Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones.

Eldest of three sisters in a land where it is considered to be a misfortune, Sophie is resigned to her fate as a hat shop apprentice until a witch turns her into an old woman and she finds herself in the castle of the greatly feared wizard Howl.

Most people will recognize as the title as the name of a movie from 2004 directed by Hayao Miyazaki. The movie is one of the highest grossing anime movies and it is based on this novel by Diana Wynne Jones. The book, Howl’s Moving Castle, was published in 1986. This book has all the enjoyable quirky humor and events that you find in the movie. This was such a fun read! Recommended for fans of the movie, and fans of  fantasy novels.

This book can be found in Juvenile Fiction section at J JONES.

~aw

Book Review: Motor Girls

motor girlsToday I recommend: Motor Girls: How Women Took the Wheel and Drove Boldly into the Twentieth Century by Sue Macy.

Presents the first generation of female motorists who drove cars for fun, profit, and to make a statement about the evolving role of women.

This books offers a deeper look at the first women to drive automobiles, including in races and throughout the World War. It also offers some fun facts along the way such as the most ridiculous rules of the road (certain mayors in Illinois authorized the police to put wire or throw logs in front of speeding cars). With lots of pictures and sidebars filled with quick facts this nonfiction book is a great read!

You can find this book in the Juvenile Nonfiction section at j629.283 MACY.

~aw

Phoebe and Her Unicorn

Looking for something fun to read?  Have you heard of Phoebe and Her Unicorn by Dana Simpson?

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Phoebe uses her one wish to make the unicorn, Marigold Heavenly Nostrils, her best friend.  Marigold Heavenly Nostrils is a majestic unicorn who isn’t used to the problems Phoebe faces, like kids thinking she’s weird, piano lessons, and what it means to be a friend.  Somehow a funny awkward girl and a self-absorbed mythical creature are able to find common ground and become friends!  If you find yourself laughing as much as I did, you will be happy to know that this is just the first in the Heavenly Nostrils series!

You can find it in our Juvenile Graphic Novels collection under J GRAPHIC SIMPSON.

Book Review: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus

cactusToday I recommend: Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus by Dusti Bowling.

Aven Green was born without arms. She has always been encouraged and supported by her parents that she can achieve anything she tries. However, when her family moves from Kansas she leaves her familiar life and friends and now she is in Arizona living at a dying western theme park where her parents become the new managers.

You can imagine it is challenging to meet friends in her new school. And there are many secrets she wants to solve. The tale of Stagecoach Pass is just as compelling as the story of Aven. You can find this book in the Juvenile Fiction section at J BOWLING.

~ra